I'm A Noob, Blues Help

LankanLatinoLankanLatino Road Warrior
edited January 2009 in History of Rock
so i know very very very little about blues other than BB King is supposed to be the pioneer for it

and i dont know if the songs Texas Flood by SRV and Red House by Hendrix are classified as blues, but if they are - i REALLY dig it

so what im askin is, can you point me in the direction of some great blues cds or just the names of some of the best blues songs?

thanks

Comments

  • timmay9timmay9 Washed Up
    edited January 2009
    Robert Johnson-The Complete Recordings
    John Lee Hooker-The Ultimate Collection
  • GowienczykGowienczyk Pooper of Parties
    edited January 2009
    A Hard Road - John Mayall and the Bluesbreakers
    A Man & the Blues - Buddy Guy
    Boom Boom - John Lee Hooker
    Confessin' The Blues - Little Walter
    Father of the Delta Blues - Son House
    Fathers and Sons - Muddy Waters
    Had to Cry Today - Joe Bonamassa
    Howlin' Wolf - Howlin' Wolf
    King of the Blues Guitar - Albert King
    Serious - Luther Allison
    Smokin' - Jonny Lang
    Trash Talkin - Albert Collins
    West Coast Blues - Lowell Fulson
  • thedoorsdkthedoorsdk Road Warrior
    edited January 2009
    I started with the British blues-rock explosion and kind of moved backwards from there. For the best transition from rock to blues I'd recommend:

    Cream - Any album will do, though Disraeli Gears and Fresh Cream are slightly more bluesy than Wheels of Fire.

    John Mayall's Bluesbreakers - "Bluesbreakers with Eric Clapton." Arguably the penultimate British blues record.

    Fleetwood Mac - Anything with Peter Green, first 3 or 4 albums.

    Allman Brothers Band - "Live at the Fillmore." Most people think of the Allman's as a country-rock band thanks to the success of Ramblin' Man, but when Duane was still alive they were one of the greatest blues-rock acts around. While their first few records are strong efforts, the energy and passion of their playing really comes through in a live setting.

    These are a good start. On all of these records you're going to find a healthy amount of covers of blues standards. If you like what you hear, find out who the original artist is (or who did other versions of it) and check those artists out as well. That's how I've acquired my knowledge of the blues (limited though it may be, in the grand scheme of things). It's an easy and effective way of branching out from artists you might already be familiar with.

    Also, Martin Scorsese put out a HUGE documentary project on the history of the blues a few years back, and there were a ton of CDs released to promote it that highlighted certain influential artists. Clapton got one, Hendrix got one, John Lee Hooker got one, and a bunch of others. Any album you can find with the "Martin Scorsese Presents The Blues" banner at the top is probably going to be a good starting point for that particular artist.

    Eventually you'll want to work your way back to Robert Johnson, who is considered by just about everyone to be the father of modern blues. They're rough recordings, and relatively tame by today's standards (we're talking stuff done in the 1930s) but his impact on contemporary blues and rock music really can't be overstated.

    Hope that helps somewhat, the difficult thing with getting into the blues is you don't want to immerse yourself too much or you might lose the original context for whatever it is you're listening to, thus not appreciating it as much as you might otherwise. This is why I would personally recommend starting with blues-rock artists from the 60s/70s. But if you want to jump right into it, feel free. There's a lot of good stuff out there.
  • GowienczykGowienczyk Pooper of Parties
    edited January 2009
    Son House was just as much the father of blues as Robert Johnson was.
  • WhiffleBallTonyWhiffleBallTony Headliner
    edited January 2009
    Here are some guys to check out:

    Albert King
    Robert Johnson
    Leadbelly
    Buddy Guy
    Muddy Waters
    John Lee Hooker
    Taj Mahal
    Willie Dixon
    Junior Wells
    T-Bone Walker
    Howlin' Wolf

    There are some people to start off with.
  • GowienczykGowienczyk Pooper of Parties
    edited January 2009
    WhiffleBallTony;1859985 said:
    Here are some guys to check out:

    Albert King
    Robert Johnson
    Leadbelly
    Buddy Guy
    Muddy Waters
    John Lee Hooker
    Taj Mahal
    Willie Dixon
    Junior Wells
    T-Bone Walker
    Howlin' Wolf

    There are some people to start off with.
    lolimentionedhalfofthem
  • WhiffleBallTonyWhiffleBallTony Headliner
    edited January 2009
    Gowienczyk;1859995 said:
    lolimentionedhalfofthem
    Screw reading threads.
  • wolfbanewolfbane Opening Act
    edited January 2009
    muddy waters-feels like rain
    john mayall blues brealkers-all your lovin'
    jimi hendrix-redhouse(live)
    blind faith-sleeping in the ground
    the black crowes-oh,josephine
    the paul butterfield blues band-work song
    eric clapton-from the cradle(the whole cd..seriously)
    jeff healey-highway 49
    fleetwood mac(with peter green)-looking for somebody
    bo diddley-diddy wah diddy
    howlin wolf-spoonful
    otis rush-i can't quit you baby
    sonny boy williamson-help me
    hubert sumlin-evil
  • blackfeltfedorablackfeltfedora Opening Act
    edited January 2009
    http://www.amazon.com/gp/offer-listing/B0000ALFXV/sr=/qid=/ref=olp_tab_all?ie=UTF8&coliid=&me=&qid=&sr=&seller=&colid=

    Available used from Amazon for 13 bucks with shipping. It's not a comprehensive collection, but it has many of the greats and gives you a good feel for some of the different types of blues.
  • OldFogeyOldFogey Road Warrior
    edited January 2009
    Well, it's not exactly the answer to your question, OP, but I've been running a battle of guitar instrumentals, and the latest round is a battle of blues instrumentals. Might be some good tunes and artists for you to pick up in on that one. At any rate you and all other contributors to this thread are strongly encouraged to add your voices to the poll:

    http://www.rockband.com/forums/showthread.php?t=117935
  • cherokeesamcherokeesam Washed Up
    edited January 2009
    Robert Johnson was definitely the father of the blues, but you're going way back to the 20s and 30s. The *beginnings* of rock 'n' roll are seeding there, but not enough to really call it rock 'n' roll yet. Or blues rock, to be more accurate.

    Blues rock is the direct godfather of rock 'n' roll. Muddy Waters, Chuck Berry, Howlin' Wolf, BB King and Bo Diddley were the guys from the 50s who cultivated the sound that British blues rockers would emulate in the 60s.
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