The Misfits: Were They Serious?

DookieManDookieMan Road Warrior
edited March 2009 in History of Rock
This question dawned upon me today, and I didn't know where else I could ask this but here.

Were the Misfits serious about their lyrics? I mean, a ton of their songs are almost humorous with their themes. Take the song Saturday Night. It's about him murdering his girlfriend, then the rest is a sob story about how he misses her.

So, in conclusion, were the Misfits serious with the whole thing, or were they just goofing off?

Comments

  • edited March 2009
    I think it was a little of Column A and a little of Column B.

    They wrote some amazing songs, and remain one of the most iconic punk bands of all time, but many of their songs are definitely very tongue in cheek. As cool and bleak as songs like She, Bullet, and Where Eagles Dare were, Mommy, Can I Go Out and Kill Tonight? and Braineaters are among their sillier songs.

    Danzig proudly wears his goth influences on his sleeve and continues to write serious material to this day. But Jerry and Doyle, I think, were far more invested in the spectacle and performance aspect of the Misfits. I've read stories about them blasting arena rock like Van Halen of AC/DC while they decorated their basement like a dungeon and carved bat wing headstocks for their guitars. That's not really the vibe I get from Danzig.

    But considering they adopted most of their image from the influence of campy sci fi and horror B movies from the 50's, it's no surprise that their stuff walks the line between sinister and ridiculous.
  • Soror_YZBLSoror_YZBL Road Warrior
    edited March 2009
    Like all good deathrock and early goth, about 25% of their lyrics was real emotion and experience, and about 95% was snotty punk rock antics. They replaced the anarchy that everyone else was singing about with b-movies, threw in some alice cooper antics and elvis presley cool, and made a career out of it.
  • LolicatLolicat Road Warrior
    edited March 2009
    Soror_YZBL;2064354 said:
    Like all good deathrock and early goth, about 25% of their lyrics was real emotion and experience, and about 95% was snotty punk rock antics. They replaced the anarchy that everyone else was singing about with b-movies, threw in some alice cooper antics and elvis presley cool, and made a career out of it.
    Like all good deathrock and early goth, they had 120% lyrics.
  • AxlVanHagarAxlVanHagar Road Warrior
    edited March 2009
    Were they serious? Yup, seriously awesome! :D
  • seinmanseinman Road Warrior
    edited March 2009
    HMXHenry;2062095 said:
    But considering they adopted most of their image from the influence of campy sci fi and horror B movies from the 50's, it's no surprise that their stuff walks the line between sinister and ridiculous.
    I don't think it could be said any better than this.
    AxlVanHagar;2064838 said:
    Were they serious? Yup, seriously awesome! :D
    Scratch that, this is how to say it better.
  • afterstasisafterstasis Washed Up
    edited March 2009
    to be quite blunt, i very seriously do want your skull.
  • My name is FezMy name is Fez Road Warrior
    edited March 2009
    Lolicat;2064356 said:
    Like all good deathrock and early goth, they had 120% lyrics.
    This made me laugh really hard.
  • CycoMiko138CycoMiko138 Rising Star
    edited March 2009
    Lolicat;2064356 said:
    Like all good deathrock and early goth, they had 120% lyrics.
    Actually, The Misfits had 138% lyrics. The last 18% was lost in bad enunciation and sub-standard album production.
  • Soror_YZBLSoror_YZBL Road Warrior
    edited March 2009
    CycoMiko138;2065289 said:
    Actually, The Misfits had 138% lyrics. The last 18% was lost in bad enunciation and sub-standard album production.
    You're so clever. :)
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