How do you guys condense everything into one TRKS file?!

RoflcopterrrRoflcopterrr Opening Act
edited October 2009 in The Rock Band Network
I'm working on a song that was recorded back in the days of the 24-track, and this band was really pushing that technology with this song. I won't reveal the name, but different sections of vocals and guitars are in different sections throughout the entire song. For example, there's vocals in the guitar tracks in certain areas, guitar in drum tracks in certain areas, etc... How do the guys at Harmonix make all the background music into one file?

Comments

  • davidshekdavidshek Community Playtester
    edited October 2009
    Roflcopterrr;3192957 said:
    I'm working on a song that was recorded back in the days of the 24-track, and this band was really pushing that technology with this song. I won't reveal the name, but different sections of vocals and guitars are in different sections throughout the entire song. For example, there's vocals in the guitar tracks in certain areas, guitar in drum tracks in certain areas, etc... How do the guys at Harmonix make all the background music into one file?
    You can do that in any DAW, like Reaper for example. Or really, you could do it in any audio editing program too, like Audacity.
  • DavyinaTogaDavyinaToga Road Warrior
    edited October 2009
    I hope it's all background instruments you're talking about!

    It sounds like you won't be able to get a clear, isolated vocals track (or guitar OR drums, for that matter). Unless you can switch to another guitar part when the vocals appear over the main track, you may be SOL ... that would be hardcore depressing.

    If you're lucky and it's not, you can just mute all the playable tracks, then render/export/bounce the poject. Rename that file TRKS and re-insert it back into the project. Then you can delete all the tracks that went into it.
  • nothingsnothings Unsigned
    edited October 2009
    You split each track into multiple tracks, one track for the parts that are gutiar parts, one for the parts that are vocal parts, one for the parts that are TRKS parts, etc.

    Then you make a new mix, with a submix for all the playable guitar parts, a submix for all the sung vocal parts, a submix for bass, three submixes for drums, and a submix for TRKS with all the unused parts above.

    Then you render out those submixes to new tracks, which are the tracks that go into Magma.
  • DavyinaTogaDavyinaToga Road Warrior
    edited October 2009
    nothings;3193512 said:
    You split each track into multiple tracks, one track for the parts that are gutiar parts, one for the parts that are vocal parts, one for the parts that are TRKS parts, etc.

    Then you make a new mix, with a submix for all the playable guitar parts, a submix for all the sung vocal parts, a submix for bass, three submixes for drums, and a submix for TRKS with all the unused parts above.

    Then you render out those submixes to new tracks, which are the tracks that go into Magma.
    By "submix" do you mean the track folders that Reaper does, or just new tracks with all the playable sections combined into one track for each instrument/TRKS? I ask because it's my understanding that Reaper couldn't combine tracks in a folder into one file, and I would love to be wrong about this.
  • davidshekdavidshek Community Playtester
    edited October 2009
    DavyinaToga;3193796 said:
    By "submix" do you mean the track folders that Reaper does, or just new tracks with all the playable sections combined into one track for each instrument/TRKS? I ask because it's my understanding that Reaper couldn't combine tracks in a folder into one file, and I would love to be wrong about this.
    A "submix" usually means several tracks mixed together into one separate track.

    But even if Reaper couldn't do that (which it can), you can always do it in another editor like Audacity (which is free).
  • nothingsnothings Unsigned
    edited October 2009
    A "submix" usually means several tracks mixed together into one separate track.
    Well, mixed together, yes; into one track, not exactly. (And I'm not just nitpicking, since the question at hand is how to end up with one track.) Here's the first google hit for submix.
    I ask because it's my understanding that Reaper couldn't combine tracks in a folder into one file, and I would love to be wrong about this.
    I don't know if Reaper has an automatic way to do it, but what works well enough is to solo the folder (Reaper is smart enough to know that means to solo everything inside the folder), and then render.
  • davidshekdavidshek Community Playtester
    edited October 2009
    nothings;3194652 said:
    I don't know if Reaper has an automatic way to do it, but what works well enough is to solo the folder (Reaper is smart enough to know that means to solo everything inside the folder), and then render.
    Which renders them all into one file, the submix. Thank you for proving my point. :)
  • nothingsnothings Unsigned
    edited October 2009
    Yes, (a) I proved your point that you can indeed mix them down in Reaper (in regards to which I thought it might be more useful to give an explanation of how rather than to answer the question with 'yes you can' :) ), but (b) there's an ambiguity in the meaning of the word "track" which is why I drilled into the meaning of submix not necessarily requiring "track". For example, in my RBN efforts, there is a guitar submix and then I render out a "stem" of the submix for use in Magma, but the stem isn't reimported into the original reaper file; the rendered submix is never a "track" of that reaper file. (Arguably the folder is, but it's a weird kind of track, and in other programs it might be a bus without being a track.) Again, when trying to help someone, being ambiguous is probably not much help. :)
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