2 quick questions

DHatchDHatch Unsigned
edited December 2009 in The Rock Band Network
1. Easy question - How do you turn click track off? I somehow turned it on and it helped with drum authoring, now that done with drums it's kind of annoying. I know that i can mute the drum midi track, but how else can i shut off click track?

2. My song has 3 seperate guitar audio tracks. IF for example, i want the playable part for the versus to be guitar one, the chorus to be guitar 2 and maybe a seperate part later in the song to be from guitar 3. I read that i need to put all the playble parts onto 1 seprate track. How do i go about doing this? Keep in mind that i am new to reaper and DAW's in general.

Thanks in advance!

Comments

  • DavyinaTogaDavyinaToga Road Warrior
    edited December 2009
    1. In the upper left corner of the window, there is a set of buttons (new project, open, snap to, etc). Look for the one that's a triangle with a line coming out the right side. It should be on the right end of the upper row. That's the Metronome button, it should be green and indented if it's on. It works just like a real metronome - clicks to a certain rate, measuring bpm. Just turn the button off, and the click should go away!

    2. One thing that you'll quickly learn how to do is to Split tracks.

    Usually, you can do that by right-clicking on a track and selecting it from the popup menu. In Reaper you can split it either where the playhead is (the red vertical line that moves when you play the song), or where the mouse cursor is (it has to be over the track where you want to split it, so you have to right-click the track, move your mouse off the menu to where you want to split the track, and then use the arrow keys to choose the "Split@mouse" command). There's also the "Split at prior zero crossing." don't worry about that one for now.

    Once the guitar tracks have been split where the player will switch, you then combine all the playable parts into one track, and the non-playable parts into another, along with all the other non-played tracks.

    Now, Reaper has a cool trick it can do called "Track folders." Basically, it can turn one track (the "folder")* into a combination of other tracks (the "items")*, allowing you to manipulate both the items individually, or all at once via the folder track. All that has to be done is to move a track you want to be an item track over another track (that will become the folder track), and the item track should appear below the folder track, indented. Be sure to move the actual track itself, not whatever file you have in the track ;) and remember that folder tracks can have their own audio files in them as well.

    So, one option, after splitting all three tracks where they will switch parts, is to duplicate them (via the menu bar or the popup menu), and put a copy of each track as item tracks into two empty folder tracks, one named "GUITAR" and the other "TRACKS." In the three item tracks inside the GUITAR folder, delete each section (the ones that you made by splitting the track) that will not be played by the player. In the TRACKS folder, do the exact opposite: delete all the sections that will be played. Eventually you can add every other non-played track (i.e. backup vocals, horns, sound effects, etc) into the TRACKS folder track, but you don't need to do that right away.

    Now, the final step.
    You'll want to lengthen the remaining pieces of each track just a little bit, and then make sure the ends fade just a hair to avoid any snaps, pops, or other extraneous noises that may occur from the sudden changes in the sound waves. Once you're ready to mix (which'll happen a little later, when you're a bit more familiar), you'll be able to make sure each playable guitar part is at the same volume as the others (by moving the item tracks' volume slider), then use the folder track's slider to properly mix the entire guitar part with everything else (same deal for the TRACKS folder, once it's ready), and render the entire folder into one track for Magma (again, another lesson for later).

    Here's a crude visual representation of what it would look like, assuming the player would have a short break in the middle:

    BEFORE

    ::Guitar A-----vVVVVVVVVVVVVVv-----vVVVVVVVVVVVv-
    ::Guitar B------------vVVVVv------------------vVVVVVVVVVVVv-
    ::Guitar Cvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv--------


    AFTER

    GUITAR
    ::Guitar A-----vVVVv--------vVVVv-----------------------------vVVVv-
    ::Guitar B------------vVVVVv------------------vVVVv---------------------
    ::Guitar C---------------------------------------------------vVVVVv----------
    TRACKS
    ::Guitar A------------vVVVVv-----------------vVVVVVVVVv------------
    ::Guitar B--------------------------------------------------vVVVVVVVVVv-
    ::Guitar C----vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv------------------------

    In this example what the guitar part would be charted to would be Guitar A, then B, A again, a short pause, back to Guitar B, then to new part C, and finally A once more. As one part is being played, if the other guitar parts have something it's heard in the background, even when the played part changes between tracks.

    This is not the only method to do this, but it is fairly easy, and prevents any steps that could not be undone. So much for quick answers to your quick questions. I hope you're able to follow this... Good luck!
  • DHatchDHatch Unsigned
    edited December 2009
    Thanks, im looking at quesiton number 2 right now, wow great info. In regards to question number 1. I played with the metronome and discovered it's not the clicking from the metronome but a clicktrack that clicks on every note, changes pitch depending on the color of the note. It helps to listen to while authoring the drum tracks. After doing some plahing around i figured out it's an fx called "VSTi:ReaSynth (cockos). I was able to shut it off by disabling fx on the master for drum midi track or if you highlight the drum midi track and hit shift+f to open the FX options. Then right click in the frame around the FX window, select dock fx browser. Then you will see the FX you are using on the left. I simply unchecked the ReaSynth FX that i mentioned before.
  • trg007trg007 Your Ever Rocking RBN Forum Guru
    edited December 2009
    DHatch;3335712 said:
    Thanks, im looking at quesiton number 2 right now, wow great info. In regards to question number 1. I played with the metronome and discovered it's not the clicking from the metronome but a clicktrack that clicks on every note, changes pitch depending on the color of the note. It helps to listen to while authoring the drum tracks. After doing some plahing around i figured out it's an fx called "VSTi:ReaSynth (cockos). I was able to shut it off by disabling fx on the master for drum midi track or if you highlight the drum midi track and hit shift+f to open the FX options. Then right click in the frame around the FX window, select dock fx browser. Then you will see the FX you are using on the left. I simply unchecked the ReaSynth FX that i mentioned before.
    Another way is to click that little circle next to "FX" to toggle it on/off (it'll turn green/red accordingly).
  • DHatchDHatch Unsigned
    edited December 2009
    trg007;3335776 said:
    Another way is to click that little circle next to "FX" to toggle it on/off (it'll turn green/red accordingly).
    Actually that was what i was trying to say when i said "shut it off by disabling fx on the master for drum midi track", lol. Poorly worded on my part, but you are correct. Thanks.
  • DHatchDHatch Unsigned
    edited December 2009
    DavyinaToga;3334646 said:
    1. In the upper left corner of the window, there is a set of buttons (new project, open, snap to, etc). Look for the one that's a triangle with a line coming out the right side. It should be on the right end of the upper row. That's the Metronome button, it should be green and indented if it's on. It works just like a real metronome - clicks to a certain rate, measuring bpm. Just turn the button off, and the click should go away!

    2. One thing that you'll quickly learn how to do is to Split tracks.

    Usually, you can do that by right-clicking on a track and selecting it from the popup menu. In Reaper you can split it either where the playhead is (the red vertical line that moves when you play the song), or where the mouse cursor is (it has to be over the track where you want to split it, so you have to right-click the track, move your mouse off the menu to where you want to split the track, and then use the arrow keys to choose the "Split@mouse" command). There's also the "Split at prior zero crossing." don't worry about that one for now.

    Once the guitar tracks have been split where the player will switch, you then combine all the playable parts into one track, and the non-playable parts into another, along with all the other non-played tracks.

    Now, Reaper has a cool trick it can do called "Track folders." Basically, it can turn one track (the "folder")* into a combination of other tracks (the "items")*, allowing you to manipulate both the items individually, or all at once via the folder track. All that has to be done is to move a track you want to be an item track over another track (that will become the folder track), and the item track should appear below the folder track, indented. Be sure to move the actual track itself, not whatever file you have in the track ;) and remember that folder tracks can have their own audio files in them as well.

    So, one option, after splitting all three tracks where they will switch parts, is to duplicate them (via the menu bar or the popup menu), and put a copy of each track as item tracks into two empty folder tracks, one named "GUITAR" and the other "TRACKS." In the three item tracks inside the GUITAR folder, delete each section (the ones that you made by splitting the track) that will not be played by the player. In the TRACKS folder, do the exact opposite: delete all the sections that will be played. Eventually you can add every other non-played track (i.e. backup vocals, horns, sound effects, etc) into the TRACKS folder track, but you don't need to do that right away.

    Now, the final step.
    You'll want to lengthen the remaining pieces of each track just a little bit, and then make sure the ends fade just a hair to avoid any snaps, pops, or other extraneous noises that may occur from the sudden changes in the sound waves. Once you're ready to mix (which'll happen a little later, when you're a bit more familiar), you'll be able to make sure each playable guitar part is at the same volume as the others (by moving the item tracks' volume slider), then use the folder track's slider to properly mix the entire guitar part with everything else (same deal for the TRACKS folder, once it's ready), and render the entire folder into one track for Magma (again, another lesson for later).

    Here's a crude visual representation of what it would look like, assuming the player would have a short break in the middle:

    BEFORE

    ::Guitar A-----vVVVVVVVVVVVVVv-----vVVVVVVVVVVVv-
    ::Guitar B------------vVVVVv------------------vVVVVVVVVVVVv-
    ::Guitar Cvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv--------


    AFTER

    GUITAR
    ::Guitar A-----vVVVv--------vVVVv-----------------------------vVVVv-
    ::Guitar B------------vVVVVv------------------vVVVv---------------------
    ::Guitar C---------------------------------------------------vVVVVv----------
    TRACKS
    ::Guitar A------------vVVVVv-----------------vVVVVVVVVv------------
    ::Guitar B--------------------------------------------------vVVVVVVVVVv-
    ::Guitar C----vvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvvv------------------------

    In this example what the guitar part would be charted to would be Guitar A, then B, A again, a short pause, back to Guitar B, then to new part C, and finally A once more. As one part is being played, if the other guitar parts have something it's heard in the background, even when the played part changes between tracks.

    This is not the only method to do this, but it is fairly easy, and prevents any steps that could not be undone. So much for quick answers to your quick questions. I hope you're able to follow this... Good luck!
    Thanks! Your instructions on splitting the tracks worked like a charm. Following your advice on creating the "Folders", I currently have 1 track (TRACKS) that has all my background music, and another track (GUITAR) that has only the playable guitar parts in it. Im currently creating the midi jewels for the guitar part. Thanks again.
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