Are there any authoring companies that pay the artist in advance?

AskariNariAskariNari Rising Star
edited March 2011 in The Rock Band Network
From what I can gather, the majority of authoring companies get paid by the artist, then the artist receives the majority of the money made from the sales of the song, but this is different from how most licensing works, where the artist is the one getting paid up-front. A lot of the bands I've been trying to get interested in the RBN always think that this is kind of backwards and then lose interest.

Are there any authoring groups that pay the artist, then take the money made off people buying it?

Comments

  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Road Warrior
    edited March 2011
    I can't imagine any authoring group who would think it a good idea to pay up front. Even if the cost was a 'relatively' low $10000, far too many songs barely, if ever, reach that level of sales.

    If bands don't understand that they don't get paid until the song sells, then sell them on the concept of charting their own stuff and thus avoiding the middleman.
  • whippingboywhippingboy Unsigned
    edited March 2011
    AskariNari;4326028 said:
    From what I can gather, the majority of authoring companies get paid by the artist, then the artist receives the majority of the money made from the sales of the song, but this is different from how most licensing works, where the artist is the one getting paid up-front. A lot of the bands I've been trying to get interested in the RBN always think that this is kind of backwards and then lose interest.

    Are there any authoring groups that pay the artist, then take the money made off people buying it?

    Your assumption of RBN intending to be a licensed business model is what is backwards. If Harmonix wanted your band in a game- they'd use your model. RBN is DIFFERENT. It's a means for bands to self promote by any means necessary. If they want to make their own tracks by doing it themselves- or if they want to gain publicity by hiring someone to publish for them. This is NOT a licensed business model with the intention of a developer trying to get rich licensing songs not already available for rock band as dlc. The audience is probably not there for that, and I doubt anyone would be able to successfully negotiate a deal where the "middleman" coder would make a sum worth their time.

    I've been in bands for years- I always wanted a unique way to reach a potential audience rather than simply give songs away on myspace. RBN could be just the place - but I need to see the difficulty and expense in creating a track on our own... so begins my journey.
  • AskariNariAskariNari Rising Star
    edited March 2011
    I was just wondering because I've been trying to get bands interested and when I tell them that they'd pay the authoring company their response is: "Wait, we pay you so that you can use our song? No thanks." Maybe when one of the bigger groups will eventually look into this for securing larger name artists.
  • DavyinaTogaDavyinaToga Road Warrior
    edited March 2011
    It's definitely not for the same use that they're accustomed to licensing songs for.

    Authoring groups do not license other people's music to benefit *their own* product. This is how most music is used when licensed. Commercials, movies, websites, etc use music to enhance what's shown, and most of the time it's music from someone else. That's why those people pay the artist money, because the artist doesn't directly benefit from the product.

    RBN authoring is the exact opposite: the authors re offering a service for the musician, by creating a chart to go with the music (not the other way around). It's kind of like a graphic artist designing an album for the band. The designer doesn't directly benefit from the album itself, but whatever the band offers the designer for his service to the musician's product does, be it money, fame, or free tickets. The same is true for authors, except they aren't looking for fame or free tickets.

    This is also why most authoring groups will also split profits: it's a very new method of song distribution, and bands will want to make sure they can only benefit from it. Imagine that designer now asking for a quarter from every CD sold (after the job is done) instead of $200 before he even touches a pencil. It doesn't put a dent in the musician's wallet, and both parties can only benefit from mutual promoting.

    And it's no big deal if an artist doesn't think RBN worth it. It's not much different from the artist saying "My CDD shall sit in blank jewel cases."

    tl;dr - Their music isn't for our product. Our product is for their music. That's the difference.

    EDIT: It's great that you're spreading the word about RBN to musicians, AskariNari. It sounds like the only difference to be made in your presentation is making sure they know that RBN is a utility for them to promote their music, and that authoring groups are a service available to help them do it if they don't want to DIY (which they absolutely can).
  • Catch-22Catch-22 Road Warrior
    edited March 2011
    AskariNari;4326456 said:
    I was just wondering because I've been trying to get bands interested and when I tell them that they'd pay the authoring company their response is: "Wait, we pay you so that you can use our song? No thanks." Maybe when one of the bigger groups will eventually look into this for securing larger name artists.

    They pay authoring groups for their service the same way they pay studios, or artists to do covers for their album.
  • MarklefordMarkleford Opening Act
    edited March 2011
    Strictly speaking, bands *can* get paid up front.

    The authoring/artist relationship is based on a contract, and *anything* can go into that contract. Any authoring group can approach a band and say: "We will pay you $500 up front for the rights to put the song into the game."

    But this contract doesn't *have* to imitate any existing industry contract analogy. And it actually *doesn't*, given that it's an open-ended arrangement.

    Mind, the original question was "Are there any authoring companies that pay the artist in advance?", and to my knowledge, there aren't any currently doing that. Mostly you'll see a flat fee paid to the author for giving 100% net royalties to the artist, or it will be a shared royalty percentage split between author and artists. There may be an author doing a mix of those, but they're not in the majority.

    - m
  • Santa ClaustrophobiaSanta Claustrophobia Road Warrior
    edited March 2011
    Catch-22;4326577 said:
    They pay authoring groups for their service the same way they pay studios, or artists to do covers for their album.

    Which is to say:

    STOP TELLING BANDS THEY HAVE TO PAY TO BE INVOLVED!
  • GNFfhqwhgadsGNFfhqwhgads 99% Washed Up
    edited March 2011
    AskariNari;4326456 said:
    I was just wondering because I've been trying to get bands interested and when I tell them that they'd pay the authoring company their response is: "Wait, we pay you so that you can use our song? No thanks." Maybe when one of the bigger groups will eventually look into this for securing larger name artists.
    There's some authoring companies that don't charge to chart, they only take a bit of the revenue. That's about it.
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