Rocksmith & Rocksmith 2014 discussion thread

Comments

  • RednazRednaz Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    Heavens_Saint;4371973 said:

    Terrible video is terrible. While it did show some gameplay (about 40 seconds), the rest of the video was useless and false. "This is so much better then pressing buttons" - No ****. Can they say anything more obvious? How about they just say its not compatible with 5 button guitars? Half of that video was unneeded, and the rest except the gameplay was insulting to watch. Of course they wouldn't mention RB3 pro guitar, no, we want to lie to our fanbase in the comparisons like Power Gig!

    The gameplay itself...That looks annoying. Why do the things have to rotate?
  • Funk-n-steinFunk-n-stein Rising Star
    edited April 2011
    I want to believe that Rocksmith will be as good as Ubisoft is hyping it to be, but in the meantime, I have an actual working product that I think works very well. Additionally, I have a hard time seeing how any competitor without the sensors in the fretboard will be as good of a learning tool.

    What is the supposed release date for rocksmith anyway?
  • hakko504hakko504 Rising Star
    edited April 2011
    Funk-n-stein;4371993 said:
    What is the supposed release date for rocksmith anyway?
    September '11
  • Doom878Doom878 Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    Too much speculation based off one clip. Maybe we should wait for more details and footage before we troll both companies.
  • SayburrSayburr The Always Informative Rock Band Forum Guru
    edited April 2011
    Funk-n-stein;4371993 said:
    Additionally, I have a hard time seeing how any competitor without the sensors in the fretboard will be as good of a learning tool.
    Not only that, but because of the fretboard sensors, the guitar does not have to be intune... I wonder if this new game will start missing notes when the guitar is not in tune.
  • WitticusWitticus VERY DEEP
    edited April 2011
    Sayburr;4372471 said:
    Not only that, but because of the fretboard sensors, the guitar does not have to be intune... I wonder if this new game will start missing notes when the guitar is not in tune.

    I'm betting so. When you factor in that you can use most guitars for this game, there has to be a whole swarm of limitations and problems. However I'm betting the game will tell you if your guitar is out of tune when it happens.
  • tnevakertnevaker Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    DMBillies;4371379 said:
    In fairness, Rocksmith used a 3-D representation of the notes to represent a 3-D problem (horizontal, vertical, and time). It isn't a straight horizontal scroll, but RB's notation uses chord shapes popping out of the TV to represent frets, which isn't really intuitive either.

    I think, in the end, everyone is going to have their own thoughts about what really makes the most sense. What I like about Rocksmith is that the notes light up on the fret board exactly mirrored to where your hand needs to be... and your fret board is static in real life.

    Honestly, I'd need a few hours with any kind of notation to really decide what I like best. What I do know is that I've spent some hours with RB's and I'm still having a lot of confusion, which makes me quite certain some other notation would be better. I could assume that HMX did that testing and chose the best option, but I also could assume that some practical limitations played into the final decision (e.g., fitting it into the screen space for a full band).

    This is all why I keep coming back to allowing us to have options...

    the chord shapes in RB3 are terrible, but that's mitigated by having the option to turn on chord numbering. though they should have just made chord numbering the standard default. i can't imagine many people find the chord shape notation useful without it.

    judging from what is shown of the gameplay in the last video, this has the same problem. you've got a bunch of gems coming down at you, but there are no numbers attached to them. so you have to wait til they're practically hitting that static fretboard before you know exactly which fret and string the gem is going to "hit" and therefore which fret on which string to play. that might be ok at simpler levels where you've only got a few notes per second to figure out, but what happens when you hit a fairly complex melody or solo and you've got 20 notes coming at you, trying to figure out where to play each of those notes? there's a reason they showed such easy charts in that video. if they showed the "expert" charts for any of those songs, people would be scared off, and rightly so. try to imagine that "house of the rising sun" chart if instead of just firing a chord form at you every couple seconds, you had the actual arpeggio notes coming to you at full song speed. i don't see how it would be readable at all with that kind of chart.

    i was really hoping this game would be good, because i'd definitely like to be able to use one of my much nicer guitars on a game like this. but unless they have a similar "note/chord numbering" option like RB3 and just aren't showing it in the video, this game with those charts would be useless it would be more frustrating trying to read those flying gems with no notation associated with them then it is trying to read the really fast solos at 70% speed in RB3, where at least you have the fret numbers and breakneck speed to help and make it a little more readable. unless there's more to the game than what they've shown so far in those videos, i'd have to pass on this, but i'll reserve my judgment until i hear some independent reviews and see more gameplay with a better description of all the options and features. what i've seen so far however, has dashed my hopes for this game quite a bit.
  • lvmathemagicianlvmathemagician Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    tnevaker;4372582 said:
    the chord shapes in RB3 are terrible, but that's mitigated by having the option to turn on chord numbering. though they should have just made chord numbering the standard default. i can't imagine many people find the chord shape notation useful without it.

    judging from what is shown of the gameplay in the last video, this has the same problem. you've got a bunch of gems coming down at you, but there are no numbers attached to them. so you have to wait til they're practically hitting that static fretboard before you know exactly which fret and string the gem is going to "hit" and therefore which fret on which string to play. that might be ok at simpler levels where you've only got a few notes per second to figure out, but what happens when you hit a fairly complex melody or solo and you've got 20 notes coming at you, trying to figure out where to play each of those notes? there's a reason they showed such easy charts in that video. if they showed the "expert" charts for any of those songs, people would be scared off, and rightly so. try to imagine that "house of the rising sun" chart if instead of just firing a chord form at you every couple seconds, you had the actual arpeggio notes coming to you at full song speed. i don't see how it would be readable at all with that kind of chart.

    i was really hoping this game would be good, because i'd definitely like to be able to use one of my much nicer guitars on a game like this. but unless they have a similar "note/chord numbering" option like RB3 and just aren't showing it in the video, this game with those charts would be useless it would be more frustrating trying to read those flying gems with no notation associated with them then it is trying to read the really fast solos at 70% speed in RB3, where at least you have the fret numbers and breakneck speed to help and make it a little more readable. unless there's more to the game than what they've shown so far in those videos, i'd have to pass on this, but i'll reserve my judgment until i hear some independent reviews and see more gameplay with a better description of all the options and features. what i've seen so far however, has dashed my hopes for this game quite a bit.

    As a total noob to guitars I really don't find the chord notation to be all that helpful. I just don't know what the chord notation means and it doesn't help me find where my fingers should be. It would be helpful if RB spent more time teaching me to play music instead of just how to play the song. But it is just a game, so it's understandable.
  • DMBilliesDMBillies Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    tnevaker;4372582 said:
    the chord shapes in RB3 are terrible, but that's mitigated by having the option to turn on chord numbering. though they should have just made chord numbering the standard default. i can't imagine many people find the chord shape notation useful without it.
    To me, it all comes down to the on-screen info representing a mirror for the movements of your hand if you want people to be able to read the notation in real-time (which is clearly what they were going for). Tilting the chart on end destroys some of that spatial alignment. Displaying time by having the notes move across a dimension your hand is actually travelling (along the fret board) hurts it some more. Having the note closest to the head of the guitar show up as the "root" of the chord and then popping notes out of the screen (i.e., up) to portray a position farther toward the body which is at the bottom of the TV, just adds to the spatial puzzle. Each of these misalignments is somewhat unnatural and each one adds to the cognitive load to just understanding what you are supposed to play.

    And I am talking in jargony terms because I'm graduating in less than a month with a Ph.D. studying visual-spatial skills and learning from video games (also why I can't just type a short and simple post). HMX's notation is really out of line with how a psychologist who is trying to communicate information for very fast processing would design the system. And my playing experience, which has only been at easy and medium difficulties, is only reinforcing that opinion (my hand is fast enough to make a lot of movements I miss because my hand either naturally goes the wrong way in response to the notation or I have to think too hard to interpret it and I show up late to the party).
    You have to wait til they're practically hitting that static fretboard before you know exactly which fret and string the gem is going to "hit" and therefore which fret on which string to play. that might be ok at simpler levels where you've only got a few notes per second to figure out, but what happens when you hit a fairly complex melody or solo and you've got 20 notes coming at you, trying to figure out where to play each of those notes? there's a reason they showed such easy charts in that video. if they showed the "expert" charts for any of those songs, people would be scared off, and rightly so. try to imagine that "house of the rising sun" chart if instead of just firing a chord form at you every couple seconds, you had the actual arpeggio notes coming to you at full song speed. i don't see how it would be readable at all with that kind of chart.
    I don't think it is reasonable to assume there is a chart design that will be readable, in real time, at full expert speed. Let me start there. It's too much info and it has to happen too fast (a problem every real guitar game is going to have to solve with really useful training modules and freely viewable charts as the fan base moves from easy and medium to hard and expert).

    The musicians playing these pieces aren't reading music, they are remembering it with a lot of practice. So, to me, the goal should be making the notation as easy to read as possible up until the theoretical breaking point where even if you understand the notation automatically, muscle memory, anticipation, and the planning of your next move are all required and the note chart is only going to serve as a reminder for transitioning between major parts of the piece. I don't fault HMX making a notation that I can't keep up with on Expert and I don't think Rocksmith's is going to do that.

    That said, Rocksmith is portraying "fret" numbers in horizontal space with notes scrolling toward the specific fret. It looks like the size of the fretboard expands to suit the size of these transitions. When they're playing "Satisfaction" on what is clearly a higher difficulty, you can see at least 8 fret lanes on the screen at the same time (which are labeled according to the dots on the guitar fretboard, even if the notes don't get their own notation) and they handle transitions that move very far along the fretboard by dynamically dimming the lanes that don't matter. For building people up from no skill, most easy charts really should only require a few frets on screen at a time ("House of the Rising Sun" only shows 4 frets). And if Rocksmith is creating a skill progression that values just sounding ok over accuracy to how the original piece is played, there are plenty of substitutions in easier guitar charts that wouldn't require huge leaps up and down the neck (something that pro charts in RB3 do even on easy levels and a choice I don't agree with if you want to make the game fun for new players).

    The only concern I have with their notation once the charts get really hard is that the strings are close together, so as the notes are coming toward the back of the neck, it will be hard to see the difference between strings (which they must have known since they use color for that too).

    For picking up and playing well (i.e., for complete newbs), I have to say I really like the Rocksmith notation. I also think it will withstand higher speeds than the same RB chart.

    The good thing I can say about RB's notation is that it probably does force you to think more about the song, which might really help with the transition to playing outside of the game. Also, because it forces you to read fret numbers, learning should transfer more easily to reading tabs on the fly. In these respects, RB3 may actually be a better trainer if your goal is playing outside the game, whereas Rocksmith may be more easy/fun to play inside the game.

    The irony, then, is that RB is more about being a fun "game" and Rocksmith is selling itself more as a "trainer for real guitar."
  • tnevakertnevaker Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    well i can't judge it from the point of view of someone trying to learn guitar, since i already know how to play and have a lot of experience. i can only judge the notation from that point of view, and from the perspective of an experienced guitarist, that notation is just highly confusing and not as clear or easy to read as RB3. since this game is aimed at both newbies and experienced guitar players, then, it seems like they've focused on the newbs at the expense of making it readable for experienced players, which is disappointing to me. this notation may be more intuitive for someone with no playing experience, but if the goal of the game is to teach you to play guitar, then learning songs in real time by trying to match up flying gems by depending on hand-eye reaction time is not really an effective way to learn a musical instrument. i understand why RB3 did it that way, it's focus is on gaming, and it's restricted somewhat by what came before, the vertical lanes used for other instruments, etc. but if the idea behind this game is to teach guitar, unless there's a lot more to it than what we've seen, it doesn't seem to be a very good effort. there are tried-and-true approaches to learning an instrument and notating guitar music in an easy to read and understand method, but it seems like they've thrown that out the door in an attempt to "revolutionize" the learning process. maybe they will, who knows, but i doubt it. if as an experienced guitar player i'm confused looking at their charts, i can only imagine how overwhelmed it would look to someone new. and if they did learn to play through those charts, they may end up with "RB drummer" syndrome where you can play fine when you've got an RB chart coming at you, but as soon as you sit behind a real drum kit you become totally lost.
  • DMBilliesDMBillies Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    tnevaker;4372832 said:
    well i can't judge it from the point of view of someone trying to learn guitar
    I don't really disagree with anything you said. Certainly prior experience is playing a big role in everyone's reaction to the charting methods. Someone intimate with tabs is going to want those since there's no barrier to playing. Someone not intimate with them will wonder why the high e string is at the top when it is the top string on the guitar...

    I have a little guitar experience and a good bit of 5 button experience. I kind of feel like I'm stuck somewhere in between where I want to be. I'm familiar enough with other notations that RB's system is really not intuitive and I'm not good enough on guitar to be able learn the song quickly and start to largely ignore the chart (which is what I think a lot of advanced guitar players are doing).
    tnevaker;4372832 said:
    if they did learn to play through those charts, they may end up with "RB drummer" syndrome where you can play fine when you've got an RB chart coming at you, but as soon as you sit behind a real drum kit you become totally lost.
    This was the point of my last paragraph really. I think the transfer to a real instrument part is something really worth thinking about (or is, at least, something most consumers want). I wouldn't say either of these notations is particularly friendly for applying the skills you get reading them to tab outside of the game. And we may somewhat disagree on which game is going to be harder to read, but I do think that the game being hard to read at full speed would actually help people memorize the song better for playing it outside the game... once your skills have progressed to a hard/expert level. At easier levels, readability is important to reduce frustration right off the bat. After all, just getting your fingers to do what you want is frustrating enough, you can't have the notation be difficult too.

    One of the reasons drums is hard to transfer is because you can play the drums entirely based on vision with no thought of what the drums sound like as you hit the different colors/cymbals. I imagine we'll find a similar thing for keyboard, which doesn't use a standard musical notation or even really include information about what notes you're playing (at least guitar gives you chord names). I find this problem super frustrating too... because I know I am physically capable of producing 75% (or more) of the beats in this game pretty successfully at full expert, but mentally I can't do it. I've taken to putting a cardboard box in front of the hit box on the TV so I at least have to play by ear and can't immediately get the rhythm back by sight every time I botch it... but that doesn't help me memorize the chart or read drum tab notation.
  • GNFfhqwhgadsGNFfhqwhgads 99% Washed Up
    edited April 2011
    But now stuff will float when I pick stuff up near it!


    Also, good lord, the background is going to look awful.
  • dog037dog037 This Many Days Since Last Ban:
    edited April 2011
  • tnevakertnevaker Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    people can disagree over what the best charting method is, whether one chart is easier to pick up or more intuitive than another, and so on. and maybe it all comes down to personal preference, and there is no best method, or maybe one really is more natural and intuitive than another. but one thing no one can disagree about is that there already exists a universal standard for guitar music notation, and that is tablature. if this game is supposed to teach you guitar so that you can play outside of the game, then why waste time forcing people to learn a notation system that is completely new and has no application outside the game itself, when you could be teaching people to read existing guitar notation? people will eventually need to learn to read tablature anyway, if they ever want to learn and play any songs besides the 40-some included with this game. there is more to playing guitar than just fretting a note and plucking a string. reading music notation, tuning your guitar, things like that are also important skills to learn if you want to be a guitarist, and this is an opportunity to teach those skills as well. even if the rocksmith charts were easier to read and more intuitive to newcomers (which i don't believe, but let's just say for the sake of argument) then i still think it would be more valuable to a newcomer to learn to read real guitar notation instead of one invented purely for this game alone. RB had limitations it had to work within, pre-existing conventions on how charts are displayed and the need to display several charts simultaneously, so i can understand the choices they made, even if they weren't ideal. but this is a brand new game, built from the ground up, and for only one instrument, so they have the entire screen to do what they want with, and to me it looks like they took the easy way out and mostly just copied GH/RB.

    it may look easier than tab at first glance, but i suspect in practice this rocksmith notation will turn out to be more difficult than it looks. the whole falling gem paradigm is simply lifted from existing guitar games and really the only change is that instead of a hit bar at the bottom of the screen, you have a picture of a guitar fretboard. that kind of "match the falling colored icon to the corresponding part on the instrument" may work when you're only dealing with five colored buttons and a single strum bar, but when you go up to 6 strings and 19+ frets, it becomes orders of magnitude more complex and that approach falls apart. it's also not the ideal way to learn to play a musical instrument to begin with. real guitar is simply far more complex than the plastic 5-button toy guitar and what works for one doesn't necessarily work for the other. guitar tablature may look more complicated and difficult if you're not experienced with it, but it's really not. once you figure out two basic keys to reading tab (the bottom or "lower" line corresponds to the low E string, and the numbers represent which fret to play) it's very easy to read and does not take long to pick up at all. even if it doesn't seem intuitive at first, it will become so quickly. i think that numbers tend to intimidate people, especially when they don't know what those numbers mean, and especially in relation to learning a new skill that already intimidates them. so maybe that's part of why tab looks more complex than it actually is. another thing to keep in mind is that there's more to guitar notation than just strings and frets. there's also all the various specialized techniques, like hammer-ons, pulloffs, slides, bends, etc. the ability to bend notes, which you cant do in RB, is one of the selling points, but i'm having trouble seeing how you'd represent a note-bend on that chart. guitar tab has a standardized way of notating these things, so that's another thing people will have to relearn again when going from the game charts to real guitar tabs. i think these rocksmith charts may look easier because they are more familiar to people who are used to the falling gem style of guitar game charts, and because the lack of numbers and visual representation of the fretboard tricks you into thinking it's easier/simpler than it really is, but in practice i think people will find these charts harder to follow than they look. just because something LOOKS easier doesn't mean it IS easier. the bottom line is, guitar is a complex instrument, and dumbing down the charts is not going to make it any easier to learn.

    now, regardless of whose charts are easier to read, i don't think they went with this style of chart because they thought it was more intuitive for newcomers. i think there are a couple reasons they went this way. one, they are trying to appeal to the existing guitar game player market, and these charts will look somewhat familiar to them. secondly, and probably more importantly, i think that existing forms of tablature, regardless of any advantages they may offer, just weren't visually appealing or exciting enough in a game-like format, and possibly were worried that tab-based charts would intimidate or scare off potential buyers. and there's probably some merit to that thought. i can imagine some guy who's always wanted to pick up guitar and learn to play, who hears about this game and decides to check it out. and then he sees some screenshots with something that looks vaguely like a music chart, with numbers flying by from right to left, and says "that looks boring and hard" and forgets about it, vs. looking at these deceptively simple charts, with all their colors and flying gimmicks, and thinking "that looks kind of neat and fun and not too hard to do" and so he gives it a try. maybe that's a valid reason to go this way, at least from a marketing perspective, if the goal is to get newcomers to pick up the instrument in the first place, even though in the long run they would have been better served simply learning how to read existing tablature style notation. after all, it's a moot point which way is easier to learn if the person never even tries the game to begin with. so these charts look geared at those two markets, gamers and new players. but i'm in the third market, people who already know how to play, and would just be getting this as a fun practice tool. looks like we're the ones who got left out in the design decisions.
  • c-murphc-murph Rising Star
    edited April 2011
    I'll be picking it up this September. It looks really promising.

    Might as well give it a shot; seeing as there's no Rock Band 4 and Compatible Squire Guitars lying around anywhere in Canada... Plus, I can use my own guitar.
  • SayburrSayburr The Always Informative Rock Band Forum Guru
    edited April 2011
    Heck, if this thing works out, I will buy it. This is one I will be waiting on reviews for.
  • wickedbadzwickedbadz Banned
    edited April 2011
    It'll be interesting to follow and see how it's charted, this mixing of various guitar parts in charts has always been a serious drawback of music games, hopefully they end that and you play only 1 part which you can choose.

    As far as using a real guitar goes, awesome you can use your own guitar without $$$$ mods to do so, sure Rock Band has a "real" guitar but it's a hybrid and pretty crappy as far as real guitar use goes. To be honest a game using a real guitar needs to allow you to use your own, guitarist like to play what they're comfortable with not some cheap toyish guitar.
  • SayburrSayburr The Always Informative Rock Band Forum Guru
    edited April 2011
    Just spent some time on their web site. The SxSW video was interesting in that you can see how the game is charted.

    The web site said you choose which guitar part you want to play (ie, lead or rhythm). They said nothing about bass.
  • raynebcraynebc Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    They've said that it doesn't support bass guitar.
  • tnevakertnevaker Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    yes, i remember somewhere where they said it had separate lead and rhythm parts. that's a definite plus. i also think the "adaptive learning" thing is a pretty good idea for new guitarists, as long as there's also an option to play the full chart for experienced players. i remember when i was first learning to play, my teacher would often give me simplified versions of songs to learn. it's a good way to learn, it's always more fun playing songs than just doing exercises, and if you can play something that's a close facsimile of the real thing but is at your skill level, maybe pushes you slightly beyond your current abilities, that's the best way to progress. it's not much different than the different difficulty levels in RB, except the game chooses the level for you, and also can adjust the level for different parts of the song. as long as you also have the option of choosing your own level, there's nothing wrong with this. just too bad they seem to have dropped the ball on the charting.
  • LiveHomeVideoLiveHomeVideo Trying too hard
    edited April 2011
    I will not get this game. It looks confusing, and doesn't play like a game. Plus, it's all classic/indie rock, and while I like those two genres, there needs to be more genres in there. Like funk, Metal, Prog Rock, and even Psychedelic. Pink Floyd FTW!!!!!


    Besides, The Elder Scrolls V: Skyrim looks so much more badass!
  • GNFfhqwhgadsGNFfhqwhgads 99% Washed Up
    edited April 2011
    LiveHomeVideo;4374153 said:
    Plus, it's all classic/indie rock
    There's six songs announced!
  • toymachineSHtoymachineSH Headliner
    edited April 2011
    The Rolling Stones – “(I Can’t Get No) Satisfaction”
    David Bowie – Song To Be Announced
    The Black Keys – Song To Be Announced
    The XX - Song To Be Announced
    Yellow Moon Band – “Chimney”
    Interpol – “Slow Hands”
    Best Coast – “When I’m With You”
    The Animals – “House Of The Rising Sun”
    Nirvana – “In Bloom”
  • thefncrowthefncrow Opening Act
    edited April 2011
    Keep in mind with song announcements that it doesn't mean anything in regards to Rock Band song availability. Rocksmith is not muting the instrument track on missed notes, and as a result, doesn't need separated stems to include songs in their game. So, just because something shows up in Rocksmith is not an indicator that it's potentially available to come out as RB DLC.
  • w34kn3ssw34kn3ss Opening Act
    edited April 2011
    Looks like it could potentially give Rock Band a run for its money (unlike Rock Revolution and Power Gig, which brought nothing new to the table). Granted, it won't threaten Rock Band's existence, but it looks like it has features that Rock Band is sorely missing, like a practice mode that's ACTUALLY effective. To be quite blunt, the practice mode and trainers in RB3 are terrible.
  • GNFfhqwhgadsGNFfhqwhgads 99% Washed Up
    edited April 2011
    w34kn3ss;4375250 said:
    Looks like it could potentially give Rock Band a run for its money (unlike Rock Revolution and Power Gig, which brought nothing new to the table). Granted, it won't threaten Rock Band's existence, but it looks like it has features that Rock Band is sorely missing, like a practice mode that's ACTUALLY effective. To be quite blunt, the practice mode and trainers in RB3 are terrible.
    Also, here's what it's missing to actually be going toe-to-toe with Rock Band.

    Keyboards
    Vocals
    Bass
    Drums
    DLC
    Non-Pro features
  • Doom878Doom878 Road Warrior
    edited April 2011
    w34kn3ss;4375250 said:
    Looks like it could potentially give Rock Band a run for its money (unlike Rock Revolution and Power Gig, which brought nothing new to the table). Granted, it won't threaten Rock Band's existence, but it looks like it has features that Rock Band is sorely missing, like a practice mode that's ACTUALLY effective. To be quite blunt, the practice mode and trainers in RB3 are terrible.

    I disagree that the practice mode and trainers are terrible. I started this game with 0 guitar experience except for the 2 months using my cousin's guitar and practicing with the RB trainers via YouTube. I'm way ahead of where I was at the New Year thanks to the trainers and practice a song features. I can even play some riffs that aren't in the game like LZ-The Ocean and Iron Man. Sure the speeds could be slower but I wouldn't equate that as terrible IMO.
  • AdamBenoitAdamBenoit Unsigned
    edited April 2011
    Mega-Tallica;4336287 said:
    Yes it does and I think it also had a real pickup so you could play through an amp.

    Also, it's not made out of plastic, it's made out of basswood and maple, two very commonly used woods for "real" guitars. The only thing about it is it has a very small scale which makes it feel toy-ish and unauthentic.

    I have one and nowhere is an output for MIDI. It may have MIDI pickups, but they can not be used outside of the game.
  • AdamBenoitAdamBenoit Unsigned
    edited April 2011
    skyttskytt;4336298 said:
    Huh, the more you know. I thought someone had said it was plastic, or at least part of it was plastic. I really never cared to look into it, it definitely looked like plastic in some pictures, so I never questioned it.

    It is plastic. i did not see any wood @ all when I played it for the whole hour or so.... Then I boxed it and no one on Kijiji wants to buy it. I'm not surprised :P
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