Magic the Gathering and other CCG's and boardgames discussion

Ledgo2Ledgo2 Rising Star
edited August 2012 in Less Rokk More Talk
A game I use to play (and be creamed at by my siblings) when I was younger, I only recently picked it back up. I am very happy I did, as I'm having a good time building decks and playing people around my area.

As of now, I play with a green ancient ooze/mana rush deck, and my main deck being a black Rats deck.

Now, I've been told by a lot of people rats are a bad deck to play-Yet I haven't had any problems playing this deck. It seems most people I play who try to roll giants like Akroma Memorials with beef creatures seem to get downed fast. My typical strategy with my rats is to rush early on, and when I get Marrow-Gnawer, I begin to multiply my rats.

To help multiplication of rats, I have Ratcathers, who allows me to pick a rat card of my choice from my deck into my hand. This means if I haven't gotten Marrow-Gnawer or Ink-Eyes yet, I can. The fear mechanic in this deck works well, playing other decks that cannot block any rats open the way for Ninjitsu summons on my ninjas. I carry a coat of arms, even though I know I should have something like a Door of Destinies instead, in my deck. When it comes time to multiply, I simply sacrifice a rat using Marrow-Gnawers ability, and I put X 1/1 tokens into play, X being the number of rats. As far are tournament laws are concerned, the next rat sacrificed may be a token. Let's say I had 5 rats, Marrow included. I sacrifice rat #2, and now I have 9 rats. Next turn, I decided to take out a token, and move myself to 16. Repeat, win by mass zerg. Add a coat of arms (Every creatures gets 1/1 for each creature in play it shares a creature type with), and I can swarm 106 105/105 rats. Add a Pestilence Rat (Is */3, * being the number of rats in play), and even if I face another weenie deck, I can send a single rat with a higher number and fear to deal the killing blow.

The only faults are genocide cards (Destroy all target creature types), and playing other rat decks get fun. The only other rat deck I played was a Relentless Rats, a coworker of mine had gotten pretty mad he was rushed and beaten by my rats. He constructed this deck (24 Relentless Rats. For those that don't know, there is no limit on how many relentless rats you may have in your deck, and they recieve 1/1 for each relentless rat in play). Using the logic that I would feed him, we had a stand off (With our rats being around 201/201) until I played a Pestilence rat. Being around 405/202 (I hardly remember), I laid waste to his defense and steamrolled him.

Now that I'm done being a geek. I suppose this opens discussions.

Comments

  • Ledgo2Ledgo2 Rising Star
    edited August 2011
    I have been thinking of getting into Warhammer, but Magic is actually cheaper for me currently. I also am very bad at painting minis, evidence being my D&D sorcerer.
  • edited August 2011
    I used to play Warhammer Fantasy a lot, but Games Workshop's business strategy is absolutely terrible towards veteran players. With the release of the past two editions, they've made my main army, a magic-based Tzeentch mortal/daemon Chaos army, absolutely unplayable: seventh edition no longer allowed the classical hybrid mortal/daemon armies for Chaos, instead splitting the army into two separate army lists, and nerfed the Mark of Tzeentch (a special ability all my units had) into something utterly useless (I would've understood a small nerf, but not that), and then 8th nerfed magic in general. I still have a (fully unpainted) Empire army as well that's playable, but having my almost painted army rendered useless in two years time was a big slap in the face. Their PR is pretty horrible as well... they actually had to close down their official forums because of what a cesspool they had become, and all the good commenters and even the devs had fled to specific fan forums.

    As for CCG's, I've dabbled in Jyhad/Vampire (which I liked at the time, to be honest), and the Star Wars and Star Trek CCG's, and actively collected/played Shadowfist, Buffy the Vampire Slayer and Wheel of Time. The latter is still my favorite CCG of all time, and the only game that I actively played tournaments for (I was reigning Dutch champ when Precedence went under), and I was involved in developing fan-made expansions for a bit after the last official set, but those kind of things never last long.

    As for Magic, I'm actually pretty excited about the new Innistrad set, both because of the Ravenloft-eque horror theme and because Richard Garfield's actually involved in the design again.
    Dante1847;4465794 said:
    have a cousin who was an artist for Magic. Jeff Menges. He does some fantastic work

    Just looked him up in the Gatherer and he made a lot of 'the classics', especially for black. Shame he hasn't done any work for Wizards for a while.
  • Ledgo2Ledgo2 Rising Star
    edited August 2011
    I wonder if he has. I myself find some of the new editions of Magic as little more down hill compared to the earlier sets. I'm not a fan of Planewalkers or how they're really pressing them (In my own opinion). Though I still find good cards in each edition they print that I can manage to use.

    I haven't actually played Warhammer tabletop yet. My uncle has a few orc armies, and I was thinking of buying the Vampire set and making an undead army, however, I have no clue where to even start with any of it.
  • edited August 2011
    If you want to start out with Warhammer, the easiest way is picking up the general rulebook, the army book for the army you wish to play. After reading the rulebook and army book, you should have some idea on how to build an army (I'd start out with a 1500 point army at first, which is a decent amount of troops, and something you can easily expand upon later) and what models you'll need to build it. Most armies also have 'batallion boxes' which give you a certain amount of basic troops at a slightly discounted price, which can be helpful when starting out too.

    From my own experience with Vampire Counts, I can say that your army will mostly consist of hordes and hordes of skeletons and zombies, which are pretty crap stat-wise, but all cause fear (which can often win you a battle without a single blow being struck because the opposing units panic and flee, morale plays a huge role in Warhammer Fantasy) and can be reanimated by your hero character(s) if you start taking losses. Your cheap, crappy main troops are backed up by some of the most hard-ass (but expensive, point-wise) rare units and hero/lord characters in the entire game. Vampire Blood Knights are some of the scariest heavy cavalry troops out there, and a bit of a must have in any VC army. The main thing you need to be careful of when playing is that your general doesn't get killed: since it's his magic holding the animated horde together, your troops will slowly start to fall apart if he bites the dust.
  • afterstasisafterstasis Washed Up
    edited August 2011
    VC was my main Warhammer army. They were loads of fun to play and paint.
  • Ledgo2Ledgo2 Rising Star
    edited August 2011
    Mine as well rename this the Table Top & CCG Game thread.

    The hobby store I go to has, last time I checked, over 3000+(Probably exagerating) zombies and skeletons, four different counts and I don't even recall any Blood Knights, if I recognized them at all. Overall, for someone getting into the game, is VC a reccomended army to try?
  • edited August 2011
    I'll rename the thread if you'd like and don't mind the broader scope.

    VC is fine as a starter army. Most armies are, to be honest, except for arguably Tomb Kings (an Egyptian-style undead army that requires a lot of synergy between units to work well and has a steep learning curve).

    If you actually intend to play rather than collect, the most important thing to ask yourself is what kind of play style seems like fun to you: do you want a large horde-style army with lots of cheap units or a smaller army of elite units, do you want to focus on brute force, magic, long range combat, outmaneuvering your enemy or a little bit of everything, etc.
    I'm mentioning this because of my own experience with the game: although I absolutely love GW's Chaos mortal models, I absolutely hate the way standard Chaos mortal armies play, and that's why I'm so upset about the rules changes that made my own hybrid army impossible, because it was the only way to break the Chaos mold of 'try to get into melee and win the game that way before getting shot to pieces on your slow approach'. I'm now stuck with about half a mortal army and a fraction of a daemon army that I'll never use again because mortals are no fun and daemons are expensive and require a lot of self-made miniatures to represent units (not every unit in the army book has an actual model, which requires you do do home-made conversions of bits and pieces of existing mini's).

    On the other hand, I thoroughly enjoy playing Empire with its versatility and awesome (if highly unpredictable) artillery units. It's just that I'm a bit daunted to start painting it all. :)

    So if you want to play, it's important to check out which army suits you play style-wise as well as aesthetically before committing to it and investing in a lot of expensive mini's.
    You can find a lot of info online, but I'd also be happy to write up a brief run-down of all the armies here, if you want (unless you're already dead set on the VC, of course).
  • Ledgo2Ledgo2 Rising Star
    edited August 2011
    Go for it! Discussions are awesome.

    I am not dead set on VC's. The guy there ("That Warhammer guy", as they put it) actually reccomended me to start empire. However, at the steep prices they had I thought I would start in an army I use to. In a lot of RTS enviorments I am comfortable in Zerg like armies, using a lot of manuevering and use of meat shield units to work the elite or strategic units. I have been meaning to look into getting a general rule book from my uncle to even see if it's interesting. I also learned he has an army of rat men, which look pretty cool.

    The downfall of this game to be seems the money you need to invest. And I totally agree on painting. I've been debating ordering some units that are already painted because I am awful at it. Though my uncle does some pretty cool stuff with his batallions. His orcs are missing teeth, he even made some miss an arm and stuff. I can totally see where you make your army unique.
  • edited August 2011
    I had such a great experience with Magic in high school and college over 5 years.

    Used to collect sets, had complete sets of everything from Unlimited through the Mercadian Block. Power 9, Arabian Knights, Legends (the best set card for card, IMHO), all sorts of rare/promo stuff and so on. Worked summer jobs and scoured Ebay for years to pay for it all.

    As much fun as I had, it all ended pretty badly though. Disagreed with almost everything WOTC did in the "modern" age of magic... dumbing down the game rules, foil chase chase, obsoleting old cards from tournaments, the rapid release cycle of sets, bad card choices for the "standard" block, etc.

    All of that was potentially tolerable, but it was in the climate of the midwest here, which was (and still is) anti-fantasy, anti-gaming, anti-fun. So here I was, sitting on (today's value) $20,000 to $25,000 in cards, with literally no one to play them with. The few card shops and tournaments in the area dried up, mostly because players couldn't keep up with buying new sets.

    (Side note: Online Magic was still a couple years away, and even then, I'm not sure I would have agreed to re-buy cards in digital form)


    In the end, sold all of the most valuable goodies, used the money to put myself through college. I still have an entire closet of mid and low grade cards, most of them "vintage" by now. They await the day I have kids of my own or find some like-minded group who enjoys them, although I expect that won't happen for some time.
  • I_Love_YouI_Love_You Road Warrior
    edited August 2011
    Most of my friends play, so I ended up playing too. It's nice though, I've spent almost nothing (maybe $100), and my two EDH decks are still incredibly good (UW Grand Arbiter and RUG Riku of Two Reflections). I only actually play EDH, since I don't play competitively or anything. Since I don't see the Magic playing friends too often, I don't invest much in the game... and I do have a tendency to spend too much money so I don't want to do that.
  • Ledgo2Ledgo2 Rising Star
    edited August 2011
    I can see where that would get you, Apples. Thankfully I still have a good player base in my area. Most are newer set players, though I never seem to have any problems playing them. Thankfully I used MtG Apprentice and dueled it out with a few other people I found on the internet before I constructed these decks. While the physical decks haven't been played heavily, the blueprints to the deck have been subject to weeks of testing before I settled on something. Looking through my documents, I can find around 6 different versions of my rats deck, and about 11 of my Ancient Ooze.

    I have maybe 5 people in my town I can play. My work place can up my count to 7, I know 3 more people in the town over who play, as well as their connections, and I have done a few pick up games at the hobby shop. Overall, I have 10-13 people I can contact if I ever want to do a game. I've been very tempted to form a weekly play, as my dad had done, a wizard war circle. The only issue would probably be the gas to play. Overall I've probably invested $300 or so into my cards, my most expensive investment being Platinum Angels. However, overall, the largested purchase I've made was a rare card for my brothers Megrim, Cao Cao Lord of Wei. The rarity and the use of the card makes it a gem in a lot of circles.

    All circles I play work by Ice Age era rules. Best way to describe it. All mechanics work as they were intended to work in old Magic. The only twist we have is when you have an empty hand at draw phase, you draw four. Other than that, we do Upkeep-Draw-Whatever-Attack. Whatever pretty much being your play phase, I enjoy an open flow of gameplay as opposed to strict.
  • edited August 2011
    As for Magic, I have to admit I don't mind the rules changes much, and actually like the additional main phase after the combat phase, since it allows for mechanics like bloodthirst and adds an additional element of bluffing to the combat phase (will he play another critter after his and mine have wiped each other out if I block or won't he?).
    As for players, I know our local game store has an active Magic scene, but I've yet to really check it out. I'm a bit hesitant, since every time I've seen people play Magic there so far, it's been teenagers, and I wouldn't want to be the only person my age joining in. That'd just be sad. :) I'll have to ask the store owner if there are more old farts playing.

    As for Warhammer, the brief rundown I promised:

    Human armies

    Generally speaking, Humans are completely average stat-wise, but also tend to be pretty cheap, which allows you to go for an advantage in numbers, which in Warhammer can be just as important as having good stats for your troops. There are two human armies:

    -Empire
    Take one half early Renaissance troops, one quarter steampunk artillery and one quarter religious zealots, and you have the Empire. The nicest thing about Empire is their sheer flexibility: doesn't matter if you like to put an emphasis on infantry, cavalry, ranged combat or magic, with Empire, it's all possible while retaining a decent chance of winning. However, this also means they don't really excel at anything, other than long-range combat, which due to their riflemen and war machines is quite good.

    -Bretonnia
    A cavalry army of mounted knights (with some peasant rabble on foot as backup, if you wish). A bit of a one-trick pony (pun intended): they're absolutely devastating on the charge, but if their initial offensive doesn't break the enemy, they're pretty much toast. The heraldry can be tons of fun for experienced painters, though.

    Chaos
    Chaos generally has incredibly powerful troops: their basic troops are a match for most special troops of other armies, and many of their special/rare troops are a match for hero characters. The price you pay for that is high, though, as chaos troops are so expensive points-wise that you can only field very few of them. They also lack any ranged combat troops, making them vulnerable to any opponent that can keep them at a distance. There are three Chaos armies:

    - Daemons of Chaos
    These are incredibly powerful and often highly maneuverable, with powerful magic to boot. Their biggest downsides are that you'll have even fewer of them than of the other Chaos armies, and that they have virtually no armor, which makes them vulnerable to ranged attacks.

    - Warriors of Chaos
    Strong, tough, heavily armored... you don't want to get into melee with these guys. Fortunately they're few in number and mostly consist of infantry troops, which means their assault will be very slow and vulnerable to ranged attacks and outmaneuvering.

    - Beasts of Chaos
    I haven't read their latest army book yet and have never played them or against them, so I couldn't tell you too much about them, unfortunately. I do know they're the cheapest points-wise of all chaos troops, though, so their armies tend to be more numerous. They also have a lot of monsters in addition to their regular beastmen troops.

    Dwarfs
    Dwarfs have incredibly tough, well-armored troops, and their riflemen and artillery are more than a match for the Empire, and can be quite devastating. They don't have any magic, but have enough anti-magic to often make sure their opponent doesn't either. Their biggest downside is their lack of movement range and maneuverability, which makes dwarfs a very static army that can be vulnerable to outmaneuvering or swarming.

    Elves
    Elves in general have a good movement range and maneuverability, high accuracy and are pretty tough to hit in melee combat. Their biggest downside, however, is that they're not very strong or tough, meaning that they often have trouble actually doing damage after a succesful hit, and are pretty much toast if the opponent gets a hit in. There are three types of elf armies:

    - High Elves
    Think Elrond's troops in The Two Towers. They have very good infantry troops and very powerful magic, but their troops are expensive points-wise, leaving you with only a relatively small elite force on the battlefield. Powerful on the offensive, but you can't really afford to take too many losses because there are so few of them.

    - Dark Elves
    The evil Elves. A bit less expensive points-wise than High Elves, so you'll usually have a bit more of them on the field. A very fast and maneuverable army with good magic and ranged combat options as well. Great if you like to play aggressively.

    -Wood Elves
    The Legolas-style Elves, although about half of the army consists of creatures like dryads and treants as well. A very mobile skirmishing army that excels at ranged combat and taking advantage of terrain on the battlefield, running circles around their opponent while pelting them with arrows. Just like High Elves, their relatively high points cost leaves you with a small, elite force as opposed to a horde-style army.

    Lizardmen
    Arguably the best all-round army in Warhammer. Strong rank and file infantry supplemented by fast skirmishers, a lot of big, nasty critters and some of the strongest spellcasters in the game. Their main weakness is their low initiative, which can really turn against you in prolonged engagements.

    Ogre Kingdoms
    Whereas most armies will consist of human-sized models with the occasional big monster thrown in, this army is the opposite: the bulk of your forces will consist of the rather large ogres. You won't have too many of them, but they can take quite a bit of punishment and dish it out as well. Their small numbers can be a major weakness, though.

    Orcs and Goblins (Greenskins)
    Strong and tough Orcs combined with fast, mobile Goblins can make for a lethal combination, especially since you can field quite a few of them due to low point costs. It's an incredibly random army to play as, though, because they're prone to infighting and have some very random magic, war machines and special units that can hit friend and foe alike. Devastating if the dice are on your side, but I've also seen a Greenskins player lose three quarters of his army on turn one... before his opponent had ever touched a single die himself.

    Skaven
    The ratmen are the true 'Zerg horde' of Warhammer: your basic troops may be weak, but you really do have a huge amount of them. Their special troops range from gatling guns to giant mutated monsters to ninja's, and those can all wreak havoc on enemy troops while they're bogged down in your mass of cheap rat cannon fodder.

    Undead
    What both Undead armies have in common is that their basic troops are weak, but relatively plentiful and easily replaced. They also cause fear, which weakens the enemy or even sends him packing outright before a blow has even been struck. There are two Undead armies:

    - Vampire Counts
    Afterstasis will be able to go into more detail, but as I said above: you have incredibly powerful (and expensive) hero and lord characters that can often take on a normal enemy unit by themselves as well as some nasty beasties and cavalry. Ranged combat is virtually nonexistent for them, though, although their magic can pack quite a punch.

    - Tomb Kings
    These Egyptian style undead are very maneuverable, with lots of chariots and cavalry supplementing their basic skeleton troops. Their war machines also pack quite a punch. It's a very difficult army to play, though, because your units aren't that powerful individually, and you need to coordinate them well to beat your opponent.

    Hope that gives you a bit of an idea... if you have any questions, please do ask away.
  • Ledgo2Ledgo2 Rising Star
    edited August 2011
    Whenever I play at a magic store, I sadly view the younger people as prey/lesser experienced players. I've been proven wrong a few times, but most 16 year olds in my area are the types who play the pack decks with some edits. I actually look for older players to play with, I can usually pick up a tip or two from the older dudes who are nice enough to do so. I'm pretty sure everyone has met that ONE old old table top guru, I look for those guys to play. But I play whoever approaches me, regardless.

    That's a huge list of Warhammer! I need to go through it :S
  • BulzeebBulzeeb Road Warrior
    edited August 2011
    I never got into Magic the Gathering but I noticed plenty of students during my high school years enjoying it.

    My Card Life Cycle

    Pokemon - Age of collecting: 5-7
    Where else could I start? Pokemon was already taking the nation by storm, and since I owned Red and Blue versions for the Game Boy at the time, this gave me a great start into card games. Never really battled; The thrill of opening the packs to see what I got was all I needed at that age.

    Favorite/Rarest Card Owned: Zapdos

    Yu-Gi-Oh - Age of Collecting 9-13
    So, after my Pokemon phase, I shifted over to Yu-Gi-Oh, sparked by swapping to the episode of Yugi dueling Weevil in Season 1. In this game, I had plenty of spars with my brother and dueled with lots of friends. Unlike Pokemon, I actually watched the show at the same time of my collecting. A friend from 5th/6th grade loaned me his legit Slifer the Sky Dragon, which was my favorite monster thanks to Season 2 of the show. After the Battle City arc was over, I began to lose interest and eventually, retired my cards and duel disc for good.

    Favorite Card: Slifer the Sky Dragon (Just owning him for a brief time felt like a fitting end to my collecting in this series.)

    Zatch Bell - Age of Collecting: 14
    Like with Yu-Gi-Oh, this anime also caught me by surprise. Saw a segment off of Toonami and was hooked afterwards. I really enjoyed the unique battle style of the Zatch Bell card game.

    Basically, you were given a miniature spell book like in the show and you had about twenty sleeves to construct a deck organized from left to right and cards back to back to make forty cards total. Each time you attacked your opponent, they had to flip a number of "pages" in their spell book. Whoever could knock the other player to the end of their book first was the winner, so it was a game about decking your opponent.

    Unfortunately, I didn't stick with the card series very long since I didn't have many other friends who would join in the series, but I still enjoyed the show.

    Favorite Card - Ion Gravireis (I got the Black Spellbook starter deck, so Brago was my main, and I just loved the sound of this spell's name.)



    I've got one more series I collected, but I'll save that for another day.
  • Ledgo2Ledgo2 Rising Star
    edited August 2011
    I actually recall playing The Pokeman CG on Gameboy. That's right...
  • kingtonyxkingtonyx Unofficial
    edited August 2011
    Love MTG.

    I used to be the #1 rated online player of the Pokemon TCG :D

    I also once made my own online TCG based on WWE
  • edited August 2011
    That home-made WWE card game reminds me of an actual card game I played once at a gaming convention because the creators were so friendly/enthusiastic/desperate to have people try their game. I think it was called 'Ultimate Fighting' or something like that, and tried to be a card game simulation of two fighters battling it out, and the cards had photos on them of martial artists performing the moves. It wasn't a particularly good game mechanically, but we did get a great laugh out of it when all of a sudden in this game full of otherwise realistic martial arts moves, cards like 'Body Odor' and 'Banana Peel' started popping up, complete with hilarious photos of their devastating effects on your opponent (I believe both were rares, even). It was such an incredibly weird design choice that it became hilarious. :)
  • BulzeebBulzeeb Road Warrior
    edited August 2011
    My Card Life Cycle (conclusion)

    Duel Masters - Age Of Collecting 14-15

    By now, I realized that I never got into a card series unless I had seen the show, (this likely explains why I never played Magic the Gathering despite its popularity.) Anyways, Duel Masters followed this formula. Like with Zatch Bell, I didn't have many other players to duel with, so I picked up the Kaijudo Masters GBA game. It was really fun but eventually, I gave my cards to a friend after I stopped collecting.

    Ironically, the same friend has me play with him and his collection today, and I will admit, DM is still fun because of its simplicity.

    Well, that's about it, folks. Did I think collecting these cards was a waste of money? Of course not. They were fun and I was spending money on something I really enjoyed for a time.
  • kingtonyxkingtonyx Unofficial
    edited August 2011
    hahaha "I'll get you with the BODY ODOR!"
  • BulzeebBulzeeb Road Warrior
    edited August 2011
    kingtonyx;4469002 said:
    hahaha "I'll get you with the BODY ODOR!"
    I wonder if their "graveyard" was "Out of the Ring."
  • edited August 2011
    kingtonyx;4469002 said:
    hahaha "I'll get you with the BODY ODOR!"

    I found a (bad) scan online. Enjoy.

    On a board game note, the missus and I are going to try and make the time to play our first team game of Lovecraftian co-op game Arkham Horror tonight, to see of the two of us can stop the Elder Gods and their eldritch horrors from entering the world. I've already played two solo games, but lost both horribly, mainly because I discovered that if you play solo, you really need to take the rumor mythos cards out of the game (they are pass/fail conditional cards that stay in play and at best cost you way too much time to resolve, in which too many gates open, and at worst mess up your entire game with their incredibly harsh failure punishments).
  • instantdeath999instantdeath999 Washed Up
    edited August 2011
    I played a few games of Magic once. I had a lot of fun, though I don't have enough people who'd be interested in playing to make it worth investing in the hobby.
  • edited August 2011
    That's the biggest downside of all card and board games, you need to have enough people to play with. I'm fortunate in having a wife and a group of friends that all share my hobby, even if we don't all like the same games (R'hllor knows I'll never manage to get a group together to play the Game of Thrones board game).
  • instantdeath999instantdeath999 Washed Up
    edited August 2011
    Strategy heavy game, huh? Or does it require knowledge of the books to play?

    Unfortunately, the only card game where I've had multiple friends to play with was Yugioh, and that's because we were all young. It was pretty damn fun at the time, though.
  • hakko504hakko504 Rising Star
    edited August 2011
    As can probably be guessed by looking at my avatar, I have played a few boardgames in my days as well. I did play some Magic a few years ago, but I've decided that I prefer regular boardgames ratehr than CCGs. However, the new Lord Of The Rings LCG has really caught my eye and our first playing was really good. And now it looks like FFG is adapting it to Star Wars as well for release early (?) next year. Apparently there has already been public demos at Cons in the US.

    Anyway, anyone who hangs out at boardgamegeek.com as well, can add me to their geekbuddies.
  • edited August 2011
    instantdeath999;4469253 said:
    Strategy heavy game, huh? Or does it require knowledge of the books to play?
    It's mainly pretty strategy heavy. Best game to compare it to is probably Diplomacy, but I don't know if you've ever played that.
    hakko504;4469256 said:
    As can probably be guessed by looking at my avatar, I have played a few boardgames in my days as well. I did play some Magic a few years ago, but I've decided that I prefer regular boardgames ratehr than CCGs. However, the new Lord Of The Rings LCG has really caught my eye and our first playing was really good. And now it looks like FFG is adapting it to Star Wars as well for release early (?) next year. Apparently there has already been public demos at Cons in the US.

    Anyway, anyone who hangs out at boardgamegeek.com as well, can add me to their geekbuddies.

    I only lurk at BGG, I don't have an account there... although I do have an account for the Geekstore, since I used that to get a friend of mine a Frigg character card for Yggdrasil for her birthday, so I'm not sure if that's compatible or not. Still, not sure if I'm all that inclined to post. The only board game-related community I've ever really been a part of was Warseer (for Warhammer), but that kind of ended as soon as I started getting more involved on here.

    I might need to look into that LOTR LCG. I kind of assumed it was re-release of the old LOTR CCG, which I really didn't like.

    I've mostly got my eye on the new Guards! Guards! Discworld board game coming out soon, though.
  • hakko504hakko504 Rising Star
    edited August 2011
    Der_Lex;4469278 said:
    I only lurk at BGG, I don't have an account there... although I do have an account for the Geekstore, since I used that to get a friend of mine a Frigg character card for Yggdrasil for her birthday, so I'm not sure if that's compatible or not. Still, not sure if I'm all that inclined to post. The only board game-related community I've ever really been a part of was Warseer (for Warhammer), but that kind of ended as soon as I started getting more involved on here.
    I've been a member now for 7 years, and while I do split my time more these days, I've returned more and more to boardgaming since my life has changed in other ways that will allow me to spend more time playing boardgames.
    Der_Lex;4469278 said:
    I might need to look into that LOTR LCG. I kind of assumed it was re-release of the old LOTR TCG, which I really didn't like.
    No, it's a completely new and completely different game. This one is a CoOp where you play a gang of heroes out to do missions which take place just before the LotR books, but after The Hobbit.
    Der_Lex;4469278 said:
    I've mostly got my eye on the new Guards! Guards! Discworld board game coming out soon, though.
    Yes, that looks very interesting - but as I saw it described as 'Talisman in Discworld' I'm betting Discworld: Ankh Morpork will be the slightly better game. Martin Wallace have not let me down so far. I'll get both games anyway.
  • edited August 2011
    Ankh Morpork has been on my radar for a bit longer, and is another game I'm definitely looking forward to. Nice to see both Discworld games are playable with only 2 players, since most of the time it's just the missus and me playing.
  • Ledgo2Ledgo2 Rising Star
    edited August 2011
    I've lurked around a few Magic forums. I never register because I can't keep track of the forums I post on. Typically I lurk around to pick up some knowledge. I've only posted in a CCG forum once for some card opinions. I tend to stray from a lot of forums like that due to the flamefests and the bashful output that can happen from a mere disagreement over cards/whatever.

    I have the same situation with my brother Der_Lex. For a week or two my brother would be the only person available. I actually don't mind it-It helps to make a good 2v2 team to play each other and in general to critique each other. Though being brothers, there is a lot of bickering at times.
  • edited August 2011
    My wife and I just finished our game of Arkham Horror (her first, my third). Good news is she really liked the game. Bad news is I haven't won a single game yet... yet again the terror level rose too high and monsters flooded the town. We just couldn't seem to close gates fast enough (my character getting jumped by two monsters in the second turn and never getting above 1 stamina again for the rest of the game didn't help).
Sign In or Register to comment.