SPACE NEWS! Mankind has reached the edge of our solar system!

AzureAngel17AzureAngel17 In Space!
edited June 2012 in Less Rokk More Talk
This news item dropped quietly last night, but the significance may be incredible. Over the last week Voyager 1 has begun sending back data indicating that it is leaving the Sol System (the system of bodies orbiting our sun, a star named Sol)! While there's no hard boundary between our solar system and interstellar space, this is probably as close as it gets.
SPAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA *breath* AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACE!!!
It tickles me to death that someday I might tell my kids/grandkids that humanity became an interstellar race on my 23rd birthday. :D

The Voyager 1 launched in 1977 and has been cruising towards the edge of our galactic backyard for the past 35 years. Onboard both Voyagers is also mankind's first attempt at communication with extraterrestrials, a golden record with symbolic instructions for how to play it and data designed by such minds as Carl Sagan to introduce humanity to any of our cosmic neighbors who might happen upon the spacecraft as they hurtle through the abyss. In about 40,000 years, Voyager 1 will drift within 1.6 light years (9.3 trillion miles) of AC+79 3888, a star in the constellation of Camelopardalis. In some 296,000 years, Voyager 2 will pass 4.3 light years (25 trillion miles) from Sirius, the brightest star in the sky. By then the probes will be little more than time capsules, as their onboard systems will likely cease to function around the year 2020.

:cool:

Comments

  • Hogan2000Hogan2000 Banned
    edited June 2012
    AzureAngel17;4781824 said:
    This news item dropped quietly last night, but the significance may be incredible. Over the last week Voyager 1 has begun sending back data indicating that it is leaving the Sol System (the system of bodies orbiting our sun, a star named Sol)! While there's no hard boundary between our solar system and interstellar space, this is probably as close as it gets.
    SPAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAA *breath* AAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAAACE!!!
    It tickles me to death that someday I might tell my kids/grandkids that humanity became an interstellar race on my 23rd birthday. :D

    The Voyager 1 launched in 1977 and has been cruising towards the edge of our galactic backyard for the past 35 years. Onboard both Voyagers is also mankinds first attempt at communication with extraterrestrials, a golden record with symbolic instructions for how to play it and data designed by such minds as Carl Sagan to introduce humanity to any of our cosmic neighbors who might happen upon the spacecraft as they hurtle through the abyss. In about 40,000 years, Voyager 1 will drift within 1.6 light years (9.3 trillion miles) of AC+79 3888, a star in the constellation of Camelopardalis. In some 296,000 years, Voyager 2 will pass 4.3 light years (25 trillion miles) from Sirius, the brightest star in the sky. By then the probes will be little more than time capsules, as their onboard systems will likely cease to function around the year 2020.

    :cool:

    Why would they try to contact other life? That seems rather risky?
  • AzureAngel17AzureAngel17 In Space!
    edited June 2012
    The mission isn't to contact other life. The records are intended as more of a "this is who we are" just in case the probes are found some time in the future. Given the vastness of space, it's unlikely that either probe will ever be found again by anybody once their systems shut down.
  • GNFfhqwhgadsGNFfhqwhgads 99% Washed Up
    edited June 2012
    Hogan2000;4781833 said:
    Why would they try to contact other life? That seems rather risky?
    Why? Are we a huge threat to any race that exists millions of lightyears away?

    No. Because they're MILLIONS OF LIGHTYEARS AWAY.

    To say nothing of the whole 'why is it any riskier than just existing on our own planet' thing.
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
    Happy Bday Azure!

    Also, Voyager 1 comes back looking for the creator but instead hooks up with a bald chick. Science fact!
  • Hogan2000Hogan2000 Banned
    edited June 2012
    I just don't see what they're trying to accomplishment by sending probes millions of lightyears away? Don't get me wrong, space is a incredible place.. I love to visit it one day but millions of lightyears away is a little much
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
    GNFfhqwhgads;4781837 said:
    Why? Are we a huge threat to any race that exists millions of lightyears away?

    No. Because they're MILLIONS OF LIGHTYEARS AWAY.

    To say nothing of the whole 'why is it any riskier than just existing on our own planet' thing.
    Actually, it's not a bad argument. Actively looking for alien life could be what triggers our demise. There's no reason other than statistical improbability (not impossibility) that one of our probes couldn't signal the attention of a race that has no compunction about exploiting us for their own gain.

    Even if they're not malevolent all we have to do is look no farther than our own contact with terrestrial civilizations to see the two coming in contact could have disastrous results. Try getting an LV-426 chest cold. Theraflu won't work when that thing is tearing out of your chest.
  • AzureAngel17AzureAngel17 In Space!
    edited June 2012
    The probes original purpose was to study the outer planets of our solar system. They performed wonderfully, and their missions were extended. Voyager 2 is still the only spacecraft to have visited Neptune and Uranus, and now both are studying the heliosphere, or the edges of our sun's influence in our galactic neighborhood. The thing is they don't have brakes, so once they're done, they'll just keep going on their last vector until something else stops them. Them winding up many lightyears from Earth is more of a side-effect of the mission, not the mission itself.
  • GNFfhqwhgadsGNFfhqwhgads 99% Washed Up
    edited June 2012
    No, it really is impossible.


    Odds that the probe exposes itself to other life. Virtually none.

    Odds that the life would hate us. Virtually none.

    Odds that the life COULD exploit us. Virtually none.

    Odds that the life could discover the probe's origin. Virtually none.

    Odds that their life will exist long enough to somehow make it across space TO us. Virtually none.

    Odds that humans will still exist in said exploitable state when all of the above happens in TWO chances. Virtually none.

    Odds that other life can survive in conditions WE optimized for when they arrive. Virtually none.

    It's impossible.
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
    I know I don't like when my neighbor throws their junk in my yard.

    We should have removed in mailing address on them.
  • AzureAngel17AzureAngel17 In Space!
    edited June 2012
    Another thing to keep in mind that the probes are preceeded by a century's worth of radio and television broadcasts traveling outward from our solar system at the speed of light, so the probe isn't likely to be a "cat's out of the bag, humans exist!" moment for any alien race. (For perspective, our sphere of noise is about 100 light years out. Voyager 1 is only sixteen lighthours from Earth.)
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
    GNFfhqwhgads;4781854 said:
    No, it really is impossible.


    Odds that the probe exposes itself to other life. Virtually none.

    Odds that the life would hate us. Virtually none.

    Odds that the life COULD exploit us. Virtually none.

    Odds that the life could discover the probe's origin. Virtually none.

    Odds that their life will exist long enough to somehow make it across space TO us. Virtually none.

    Odds that humans will still exist in said exploitable state when all of the above happens in TWO chances. Virtually none.

    Odds that other life can survive in conditions WE optimized for when they arrive. Virtually none.

    It's impossible.

    Virtually none and none are two separate concepts. Besides, what were the statistical odds two particles would collide with enough velocity to create an ever expanding network of systems? Virtually none, yet it still happened.

    Also, you're assuming their tech is on the same level as our own. All the scientific hurdles we have they may have already solved.
  • edited June 2012
    Happy Birthday Azure.

    I think Hogan saw Battleship.

    Anything is possible I just hope if they show up and are jerks that they dont absorb 00 buck through their skin as an energy source.
  • GNFfhqwhgadsGNFfhqwhgads 99% Washed Up
    edited June 2012
    Lawdog1521;4781865 said:
    Virtually none and none are two separate concepts. Besides, what were the statistical odds two particles would collide with enough velocity to create an ever expanding network of systems? Virtually none, yet it still happened.
    Virtually none, yup. And how long did it take? We don't know. We don't really measure that 'time'. It could have been millions of times longer than the universe has existed.
    Also, you're assuming their tech is on the same level as our own. All the scientific hurdles we have they may have already solved.
    Speed of light has nothing to do with technology.
  • Hogan2000Hogan2000 Banned
    edited June 2012
    odds of GNF knowing everything

    Virtually none
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
    AzureAngel17;4781863 said:
    Another thing to keep in mind that the probes are preceeded by a century's worth of radio and television broadcasts traveling outward from our solar system at the speed of light, so the probe isn't likely to be a "cat's out of the bag, humans exist!" moment for any alien race. (For perspective, our sphere of noise is about 100 light years out. Voyager 1 is only sixteen lighthours from Earth.)

    That assumes they are looking for or even can perceive our signals. A piece of space garbage slapping you in one of your hydra heads though would get your attention. you're right though. It is a good idea to start shutting off our radios and TV's.
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
    GNFfhqwhgads;4781869 said:
    Virtually none, yup. And how long did it take? We don't know. We don't really measure that 'time'. It could have been millions of times longer than the universe has existed.

    Speed of light has nothing to do with technology.
    Or it could have happened in the first 5 minutes. That how probability works.

    Also, light years becomes irrelevant when you traversing via space/time rather than traditional propulsion.
  • GNFfhqwhgadsGNFfhqwhgads 99% Washed Up
    edited June 2012
    Lawdog1521;4781877 said:
    Also, light years becomes irrelevant when you traversing via space/time rather than traditional propulsion.
    And now we've reached the point of asking, if they have that kind of technology, why did we need to slam into their planet with a hunk of metal for them to discover that other life exists?
  • AzureAngel17AzureAngel17 In Space!
    edited June 2012
    Lawdog1521;4781873 said:
    That assumes they are looking for or even can perceive our signals. A piece of space garbage slapping you in one of your hydra heads though would get your attention. you're right though. It is a good idea to start shutting off our radios and TV's.

    Odds are in our favor on that one at least, the chances of another race developing spaceflight without a good understanding of electromagnetic radiation are slim to none. The chances of them understanding any of it are miniscule, but they should recognize transmissions as a sign of intelligent life at least.
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
    GNFfhqwhgads;4781885 said:
    And now we've reached the point of asking, if they have that kind of technology, why did we need to slam into their planet with a hunk of metal for them to discover that other life exists?

    I'm sure they know life exist, it's that we weren't on their radar until the theoretical "space junk incident"

    I'm aware of other humans yet didn't know you specifically existed until you started posting here. Now I do.

    Let me put it another way. Somewhere in your house is a bug. Do you care? Probably not. But what if that bug just started throwing **** at you? You're attitude is going to change.
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
    Here's a brain bender...

    What if they have been getting our signals and they do understand them? Even if they couldn't understand our language, television provides a potential visual medium. (assuming they have sight)

    They may love 80's wrestling (something they may just now be receiving) and Hogan could be a deity to them. In fact, their first communication to us could be the word "bruther".
  • AzureAngel17AzureAngel17 In Space!
    edited June 2012
    Lawdog1521;4781900 said:
    Here's a brain bender...

    What if they have been getting our signals and they do understand them? Even if they couldn't understand our language, television provides a potential visual medium. (assuming they have sight)

    They may love 80's wrestling (something they may just now be receiving) and Hogan could be a deity to them. In fact, their first communication to us could be the word "bruther".

    Never give up, NEVER SURRENDER!
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
    That's what makes it so hard to contact alien life. If you think about it, only certain types of life will be able to communicate with each other or even be aware of each other existence.

    Suppose our neighbors are highly advanced yet can't see, smell, taste, touch, or hear. What if they perceive biomagnetic fields like a shark? These shark people could dwarf our own civilization in size and scope but have no way to know we're here.

    Or as space monkeys we may not be able to perceive an alien life form right in front of us.

    And I haven't even been drinking tonight.
  • FlyGuyLXIFlyGuyLXI Headl!ner
    edited June 2012
    Telescopes aside, space technology is still relatively young so don't rule out the possibilities of ever making contact or even just finding traces of extraterrestrial life in your lifetime. It might not happen, but it's pretty much set in stone that there will be other life out there. This is all best out of theory but my previous astronomy professor introduced the Drake Equation which, through a process of elimination guarantees thousands up to millions of potential alien civilizations in our galaxy. Light-years away despite.

    Earth-like planets are a lot more likely than people expect. Every star with its own solar system capable of grasping at least one of these possibilities is quite likely. It really depends on how near or far away they are to the star. Think Goldilocks and the Three Bears, it has to be just right for best results.
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
    Of course the nay sayers will throw the Fermi paradox at the Drake equation.
  • DangimarockerDangimarocker Headliner
    edited June 2012
    I wanna go to space... i wanna go to space.........
  • Lawdog1521Lawdog1521 Squirrel Chasing Expert
    edited June 2012
  • jibjqrkljibjqrkl Eventually Perceptive
    edited June 2012
  • dragoninforcerdragoninforcer UnWashed
    edited June 2012
    Happy birthday!

    Also, space.
  • DAMdudeDAMdude Opening Act
    edited June 2012
    FlyGuyLXI;4781967 said:
    Telescopes aside, space technology is still relatively young so don't rule out the possibilities of ever making contact or even just finding traces of extraterrestrial life in your lifetime. It might not happen, but it's pretty much set in stone that there will be other life out there. This is all best out of theory but my previous astronomy professor introduced the Drake Equation which, through a process of elimination guarantees thousands up to millions of potential alien civilizations in our galaxy. Light-years away despite.

    Earth-like planets are a lot more likely than people expect. Every star with its own solar system capable of grasping at least one of these possibilities is quite likely. It really depends on how near or far away they are to the star. Think Goldilocks and the Three Bears, it has to be just right for best results.

    This is true but as a space enthusiast this same truth is what scares me. Though odds of extraterrestrial life in our own galaxy is a given. (It's pretty stupid for a person sitting in their house to believe he or she is the only person on our planet.) Their are a number of planets in the Goldilocks Zone in our galaxy. Hell our own star has two of them.

    But that's the point, we now know that Mars at one point had a stronger atmosphere. Which allowed the planet to hold water, streams, rivers, lakes, and oceans. And as everyone knows, where there's water, life is not far behind. But Mars' core has stopped, it's atmosphere almost gone, it's surface beaten everyday with almost toxic levels of radiation. Mars, is a dead planet. It could of held life, maybe intelligent life. But if so, they are dead and gone now.

    Bringing me back to my point, life on other planets, given. Intelligent life on other planets, given. With as old as the entire universe is, intelligent life on another planet at the same time as us...to be honest, probably given too. But we will find microbial life first, complex life second, and most likely the ruins of extraterrestrial civilizations last.

    The human race has been an intelligent race for 4,000 years, but our planet has been here for 4,540,000,000 years. And with mankind creating new ways to kill ourselves everyday, we will probably be the hand of our own demise SOONER than later. Who's to say extraterrestrial civilizations did the same.

    With all that said, I believe we will find microbial life within the next 10 to 15 years. Complex non-living life on another planet within our generation, and we will be contacted by intelligent life by the end of the 22nd century.
  • ThatAuthoringGroupThatAuthoringGroup Numero Uno Super **** Fanboy #1
    edited June 2012
    Vger and the Borg are soon to follow :P
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