Help With Reading the Pro Guitar Charts?

TheSkittleristTheSkittlerist Unsigned
edited November 2012 in Rock Band
I'm finding it pretty difficult to read the charts for the Pro Guitar (Mostly chords) Are there any tips for better reading the chords? (I'm mostly talking about ones that span 5 or 6 strings, such as 0 2 1 0 1 0)

Comments

  • machetemonkeymachetemonkey Opening Act
    edited November 2012
    Use the trainers. They should teach you specific chords, and have you practice them. Slow stuff down if you need to. The only way you'll get better at reading them is to become more familiar with them, and have them more ingrained in your memory.

    Also, try practicing with chord-numbering on or off. Some people find it easier to be able to see the fret numbers for every string because they can read things more easily (chord numbering ON), and some people like the visual simplicity and lack of clutter of just looking at the chord shapes (chord numbering OFF). It depends on the person, so play around with it.
  • AlternityAlternity Road Warrior
    edited November 2012
    I have 2 advices to give you

    1- Begin with pro bass, so you can learn to move around the neck. Expert + No-fail is the way, even if you can't get one star at first, it'll come.

    2- Don't learn the chords with the numbers, learn the chords with the name that follows the chart to the left (the letter+ numbers). Go in the trainer, remember that D is this, and that E is this. And everything will work like a charm. WAYYYY easier to read the chord's name than a bunch of number IMHO.
  • TheSkittleristTheSkittlerist Unsigned
    edited November 2012
    Alternity, you're saying I should go straight to EXPERT bass? Meaning, from medium lead to expert right away?
    Also, does pro bass only use 4 strings? I don't recall playing pro bass, and I can't check at the moment.
  • AlternityAlternity Road Warrior
    edited November 2012
    Yes, only for the fact that to learn a song, you need to learn the song, on medium it's not the song at all. Even if you can't play it yet, you will still learn some parts each time you try. And it will also force you to practice your picking, and switching strings faster.

    Sadly, even if the bassist do use more than a 4 string bass, HMX will still only chart 4 strings for bass.
  • googleimagegoogleimage Unsigned
    edited November 2012
    Going straight to expert is a BAD idea. I'd say you should play the highest difficulty level that consistently gets you more than 3.0 stars, and frequently 4 stars.

    2 reasons: you'll get exposed to "skill development" patterns, but they'll be presented to you in isolation rather than having to deal with 10 or 15 such parts at a time; i.e. it paces your learning properly. And secondly: it's easier to track your progress and show that the improvements you're making are meaningful. Going from 1 star to 2 stars is meaningless: going from 3 stars to 4 or even 5 stars is significant.

    Also: chord numbering is a MUST.
  • AlternityAlternity Road Warrior
    edited November 2012
    It all depends on the people I guess. lol
  • SheSaidSheSaidSheSaidSheSaid Washed Up
    edited November 2012
    I play the lower difficulties on all but the stupidly easy songs (Imagine/Something in the Way/etc.) just because it's more fun. I know I'll never gold-star "Combat Baby" and I really couldn't give a crap about playing a real instrument outside the game (I play pro strictly for the gameplay challenge) so why not just have fun?
  • Derrek42Derrek42 Unsigned
    edited November 2012
    I also support the comment to go directly to expert. I was already familiar with most chords and have played guitar in the past. Trying to play on a lower difficulty had me confussed by the bastardized chord patterns. Once I learned a song on medium, I went to play on expert and had a tough time getting the chord right because my fingers were use to a different pattern from the easier difficulty. Once I realized that I could just read the chord name, I was able to finger the chord like normal and it became so much easier.....but, like I said, I already knew most chords. for a new player, this may not work well, but try it out

    Get a chord chart and start learning the chords (C D E Em F G A Am is a great start). Pick up more chords from the songs you want to play (you see a new chord in a song, refer to the chord chart and then practice it).

    Playing pro is a major step away from playing legacy guitar....you wont be able to just play any song the first couple of tries. You will have to practice the song and play it repeatedly before you can play it well.

    I also turned off chord numbering and use the chord name and shape. too many numbers gets confussing....

    Start with some easier songs and build up from there. (sort by difficulty and target songs in "warm up")
  • AlternityAlternity Road Warrior
    edited November 2012
    Derrek has a good point, however, I never really played any stringed instrument in my life, and I still can 5 stars a couple of songs on expert pro bass, and this took me not even a week. I don't play much pro bass, but it wasn't that hard to figure it out, the first days was horrible due to the learning curve, and to the fact that I'm used to see a tab sideways, not the way RB shows them to me. (I don't play stringed instruments, but I use Guitar Pro 5 for my music needs on piano/keyboard)

    Also, if I recall correctly, easy and medium doesn't use full chords, hard does though. If expert is REALLY, but I mean, REALLY too hard for you (cant get any star on any songs for example) You could get on hard, however, avoid easy and medium, the chords are just not it.
  • HitoshuraHitoshura Unsigned
    edited November 2012
    I'm with the "play pro bass on expert (no-fail) first" crowd. Full chords on pro guitar are really intimidating at first, and for pro bass you don't have to worry about this (the worst you'll get are maybe power chords and octaves), so you can focus on developing left hand awareness and getting comfortable with moving around the neck.

    The other thing I must stress is that you will NOT be able to just jump into a song and start playing the way you may be able to with legacy guitar or drums. There's just too much information coming at you to be able to do so. I've been playing pro since RB3 launched, and sightreading pro guitar is still really hard. Instead, I recommend that when you want to play a new song, first (1) go through the trainer for that song, and optionally (2) play each section in practice. Most songs have repeating patterns, and the trainer will familiarize you with these, taking a huge burden off the sightreading when you actually play the song. Playing through in practice (maybe slowed down to 70%) helps to learn the structure of the song, and to repeat shorter sections multiple times in order to lock them into your short-term memory.

    If you really hit a wall, then by all means, lower the difficulty. Some songs may just be much more difficult for you than similarly tiered songs because they require certain techniques that you haven't really developed yet. The more you play, the better you'll get. As you become more familiar with the instrument, you'll find that what seemed impossible before suddenly starts to make sense, and is playable. Little by little, you'll see improvement in your playing. Just be patient and persistent, and you'll get there. :D

    One last thing: you might try playing both with a pick and with your fingers when doing pro bass. Some songs, especially some of the hardest pro bass songs like Llama and Antibodies, I believe are only really playable with your fingers, whereas many or most of the pro guitar songs really benefit from playing with a pick. For pro bass, I find that a default position of thumb on the lower two strings (E and A), index on the D string, and middle finger on the G string works pretty well.
  • googleimagegoogleimage Unsigned
    edited November 2012
    A few of Hitoshura's points hit the nail on the head - namely the fact that on protar, taking advantage of the trainers is super-important. I know a number of top players who will spend a lot of time in the song trainer before ever attempting a real run, and it would be just as helpful for new expert players; the trainers also give finger positions to guide you.

    Pro bass is extremely helpful in training your fret hand to move across the board, but limiting in that it won't help in identifying chords and developing dexterity to nail those chords. At some point you'll have to actually play protar to improve at protar, but getting versed at pro bass can remove at least a few of the common barriers.
  • SheSaidSheSaidSheSaidSheSaid Washed Up
    edited November 2012
    Hitoshura;4928565 said:
    I'm with the "play pro bass on expert (no-fail) first" crowd.

    I would just get so demoralized by getting like 6 percent on nearly every song.
  • HitoshuraHitoshura Unsigned
    edited November 2012
    SheSaidSheSaid;4929013 said:
    I would just get so demoralized by getting like 6 percent on nearly every song.

    Well, as I said, if you jump right in and try to play songs without practicing first, of course you're going to do horribly. That's my whole point: to do well at pro, especially on high-tiered songs on expert, you pretty much have to use the trainers and practice mode. It's not as pick-up-and-play as the legacy instruments, but is IMO more rewarding once you're able to do it.

    If you're still really having trouble, even with the trainers, then sure, take it down a difficulty or two and start there. There's no sense in needlessly frustrating yourself, but just keep in mind that, by its very nature, pro will take more work and you will probably improve more slowly than you're used to with the legacy instruments.
  • Backbeat60-62Backbeat60-62 Rising Star
    edited November 2012
    I found using chord shapes to be helpful. Having all the numbers on can get confusing, for me the numbers work best with individual notes. If you're limited with time, turn on chord shapes and play the song a few times, each time trying finger positions until the right combination hits. For chord shapes that are hard to figure out, turn on numbered chords briefly to see what the proper fingering is. If you have more time, the trainers can be even more useful. It took a few months for me to be able to sight read on pro, but like has been said, it's been really rewarding to finally be able to do it.
  • ZoiloCruzZoiloCruz Rising Star
    edited November 2012
    Well all have to saw if you ever want to play Pro guitar treat it as it's a real guitar not like some video game, it takes time and practice. What I suggests is learn all the chords (even the pissing off barre chords -_-) and just practice the shape (like everyday.) Also chose songs that will help you get better on the guitar, like Nirvana songs, The White Stripes and Yoshima Battle the Pink Robots Pt.1 (good for knowing your chords). Also it would hurt learning songs off youtube vids, I've got by watching them and I'm getting the scale concept :D Just do all the simplest things you can, but also don't afraid to challenge yourself. Hope you found this useful and good luck playing real guitar :D
Sign In or Register to comment.