What defines a hit?

This discussion was created from comments split from: New Rivals Update Next Week!.

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  • bonethug0108bonethug0108 Headliner
    Vexus said:

    The stream brought up some interesting unannounced points:
    - XP glitch at results screen is fixed
    - Rivals season 7 has RBN DLC
    - Rivals season 7's DLC focus is contemporary
    - There's an early fall update unrelated to Rivals mode
    - Mentioned above but free sailor outfits come with the update
    - Season 7 and future rewards revealed on Thursday
    - Holiday DLC seems big

    I think that's it outside of the stuff already covered on the blog.

    What exactly was said about holiday dlc?
    Big names, just a brief mention. I hope it includes a return of the annual Aerosmith packs.
    Does Aerosmith still have songs not in Rock Band?
    They have more Top 40 Hits not in Rock Band than most bands that have no songs in Rock Band yet. Hell they have more hits not in Rock Band than most bands period.
    Going by Wikipedia and a definition of hit being "a single that reached any top 40": Last Child, Draw the Line, Come Together, Lightning Strikes, Let the Music Do the Talking, Shela, Walk This Way (Run-DMC version), Hangman Jury, F.I.N.E.*, What It Takes, The Other Side, Monkey On My Back, Love Me Two Times, Helter Skelter, Fever, Amazing, Shut Up and Dance, Deuces Are Wild, Blind Man, Walk on Water, Nine Lives, Falling in Love (Is Hard on the Knees), Hole in My Soul, Pink, What Kind of Love Are You On, Angel's Eye, Jaded, Fly Away from Here, Sunshine, Just Push Play, Girls of Summer, Baby Please Don't Go, Devil's Child, What Could Have Been Love.

    Things I think are particularly notable by their absence from the above list: Train Kept-a Rollin' didn't actually chart anywhere, nor did Same Old Song and Dance (from GH3), and Kings and Queens (the credits song from GH Aerosmith) only peaked at 70 in the US and 77 in Canada. That said, Rats in the Cellar was also a non-charter, and Seasons of Wither wasn't even a single.
    It's not ANY top 40. A hit is defined as a song that charted top 40 on the Billboard Hot 100 chart (for the US; other countries charts are different and thus hits elsewhere defined differently).

    https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hit_single

    "In the United States and the United Kingdom, a single is usually considered a hit when it reaches the Top 40 of the official Billboard Magazine’s Hot 100 or the Top 75 of the 'UK Singles Chart' and stays there for at least one week."

    "A hit single is variously called a number one hit, a top 10 hit, a top 20 hit or a top 40 hit, depending on its peak position."

    So no those other songs outside of the ones I mentioned earlier are not hits by definition.
  • thatmarkguythatmarkguy Road Warrior
    But that's the definition that says that Rush only ever had one hit, it's a song we don't even have yet, and nobody misses it because nowadays it's not even considered to be among their ten most relevant enduring songs. So as definitions go, it isn't an especially useful one.
  • Pretty much nobody in the UK considers anything from 75 to 41 a hit. I thought I was being generous by going as low as 40, to be honest!
  • bonethug0108bonethug0108 Headliner
    edited July 10

    But that's the definition that says that Rush only ever had one hit, it's a song we don't even have yet, and nobody misses it because nowadays it's not even considered to be among their ten most relevant enduring songs. So as definitions go, it isn't an especially useful one.

    Well Rush did only ever have one hit. The definition is what it is. But there is another useful term for bands/songs that became big after their time on the charts: classics.

    Rush has many classic songs and is a classic band, but they were not a hugely popular band in their time.

    I want to say Stairway to Heaven never charted, yet that is a classic LZ tune.

    In the same way, Train Kept A-Rollin and Same Old Song and Dance never charted because they were released before Aerosmith blew up, but they are classics of theirs despite never being hits (or even charting iirc).

    Edit:
    And I've gone over the affect of time on songs before, where a non charting or low charting song could be more popular now than a song that was a hit in it's time.

    Rick Astley is considered a one hit wonder nowadays, despite having other songs that were hits in their time. Right or wrong, most people only remember that one song now.

    But none of that changes what the definition of a hit is. It's still Top 40 on the Hot 100.
  • bonethug0108bonethug0108 Headliner
    Vexus said:

    Pretty much nobody in the UK considers anything from 75 to 41 a hit. I thought I was being generous by going as low as 40, to be honest!

    Not living in the UK, I can't really comment on that either way. But Hmx mostly uses just the US charts so that has no bearing on what would be considered a hit here.

    The funny thing is the article went on to say some consider any song in the top 100 of the UK Singles chart to now be a hit (at least that's what I took out of the next part, but maybe they meant the Hot 100).

    But here in the states hit has been Top 40 pretty much since the Hot 100 has been around.
  • thatmarkguythatmarkguy Road Warrior

    But that's the definition that says that Rush only ever had one hit, it's a song we don't even have yet, and nobody misses it because nowadays it's not even considered to be among their ten most relevant enduring songs. So as definitions go, it isn't an especially useful one.

    Well Rush did only ever have one hit. The definition is what it is. But there is another useful term for bands/songs that became big after their time on the charts: classics.

    Rush has many classic songs and is a classic band, but they were not a hugely popular band in their time.

    I want to say Stairway to Heaven never charted, yet that is a classic LZ tune.

    In the same way, Train Kept A-Rollin and Same Old Song and Dance never charted because they were released before Aerosmith blew up, but they are classics of theirs despite never being hits (or even charting iirc).

    Edit:
    And I've gone over the affect of time on songs before, where a non charting or low charting song could be more popular now than a song that was a hit in it's time.

    Rick Astley is considered a one hit wonder nowadays, despite having other songs that were hits in their time. Right or wrong, most people only remember that one song now.

    But none of that changes what the definition of a hit is. It's still Top 40 on the Hot 100.
    But if it's a definition that has lost all meaning in terms of relevance or staying power, it's meaningless.

    There may be no better example of the meaningless of that literal definition of 'hit' than the current Billboard chart. Of the top 40 songs right now, *19* of them are by Drake.

    Now, does anyone believe for even a second that Drake currently has 19 songs that will even be remembered six months from now? That his current chart dominance is at all a reflection of the same sort of generational-hit-generation as that of the artist whose record he just took, The Beatles? Or is this just an indication that the music industry is no longer causing a strong correlation between 'hit' and 'enduring cultural impact' as it once did? When the definition of a 'hit' actually mattered, because it meant people would remember the song forever, not that it was the 19th most liked song on last week's new album?
  • hiimSMAPhiimSMAP Road Warrior
    Drake is absolutely massive enough for that kind of popularity, there’s hardly a more talked about and more listened to current artist
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