Singer With Best Control Over Multiple Octaves

xanofarxanofar Unsigned
edited February 2009 in History of Rock
This is not for listing your favorite singer. Ozzy, Joey Ramone, Lemmy, and Kurt Cobain do not qualify here, so don't post them. I love their voices, but they aren't famous for their vocal ranges.

This is for listing singers you may or may not like but have to respect for their incredible octave ranges (as in, how freaking high can they go?). I've come to find that singers that fit this qualification often have voices that a lot of people don't like. This is essentially a list of singers who can switch octaves quickly and reach high notes hardly any other guy can.

: Bruce Dickinson - Iron Maiden (he can't do The Number Of The Beast's famous scream anymore though)
: Rob Halford - Judas Priest
: Michael Kiske - Helloween (I really don't care for his voice at all, but damn, he might just have the best range out of all of these guys)
: Freddie Mercury - Queen

Any other suggestions? Please, DO NOT simply list the singer from your favorite band. Looking for range here, not how good it sounds or how unique it is.

Comments

  • DM725DM725 Opening Act
    edited February 2008
    Mike Patton

    Enough said...

    Also:

    Chris Cornell (prior to 95 or so)
  • OldClownieOldClownie Opening Act
    edited February 2008
    I'll put in a vote for Freddie. I like Judas but I've heard Halford go off-key on studio albums. Live or canned, Freddie never put forth less than perfect. I don't know if his range translates to the most octaves but, of these choices, he's my man.

    On a side note. . . singer I think has the best control of their instrument: Nina Simone! Flawless. . . always.
  • OldFogeyOldFogey Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    I have a very strong opinion about this topic. You need to read this link about the different ranges of the voice: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vocal_registration. It will help you understand why what these guys do is a) unhealthy (causes nodules) and b) inconsistent in vocal production.

    Even the best have about 2 octaves plus or minus a third or so in which they can produce a consistent tone across registration breaks. Low voices tend to have broader ranges than high ones, at least for guys. Women have broader ranges than men.

    How big the range is is one of the least important things to look for in a singer. Control from soft to loud dynamics, consistent production, etc. are way more important. Check out Stevie Wonder, Jack Bruce, Roy Orbison, Steve Winwood. And Winwood in particular goes as high as you should really want a male voice to go, unless they are going into countertenor range which is a whole different kind of vocal production.
  • drunkenmonkey379drunkenmonkey379 Rising Star
    edited February 2008
    chris cornell i amazing but the years have taken a toll on his voice, which is still amazing
  • gusano311gusano311 Rising Star
    edited February 2008
  • OldFogeyOldFogey Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    gusano311;342063 said:
    cory glover
    Cory has an amazing voice. So rich in tone.
  • AxlVanHagarAxlVanHagar Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    I hear what Fogey is saying and I do tend to agree with him. That being said I'll play along with the topic at hand and list a few singers I think fit the bill. I'll try to avoid repeating one's already mentioned above.

    1. David Coverdale - always loved his tonality and ability to hit the high registers.

    2. David Lee Roth - in his prime under rated as a vocalist. Not many males can pull off the whistle register let alone command it.

    3. Steve Perry - One of the all time greats

    4. Rik Emmett - I just love how how high he can get.

    5. Ronnie James Dio - Dio's older than dirt at this point and can still deliver the goods on a nightly basis.


    6. Jeff Scott Soto - an amazingly talented vocalist that is overlooked and under appreciated. Probably in my top top 3 favorite vocalists ever.
    Here's a few clips since most don't know Jeff or bands he's been in.


    Soul Sirkus - Who's Crying Now




    Yngwie Malmsteen's Rising Force - I'll See The Light Tonight




    Queen Medley





    From the movie Rockstar , Stand Up And Shout


  • Burn1nMyLightBurn1nMyLight Opening Act
    edited February 2008
    Aaron Lewis (Staind) - He's amazing in The Outside.

    Amy Lee (Evanescence) - Nobody has offered up a female so far? For shame.

    Ed Kowalczyk (Live) - Listen to Lightning Crashes. He hits basically every note on the scale.

    Corey Taylor - Listen to Slipknot, then listen to Stone Sour. The guy can sing ANYTHING.
  • fighting69thfighting69th Opening Act
    edited February 2008
    I will say Freddie and King Diamond. Let us not forget Elvis either.

    Queen





    King Diamond





    Elvis



  • ZidaneZidane Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    Of course you know who I'm going to pick for this, but besides Mr. Mercury, Ronny James Dio has amazing control of his voice while singing. And I also think Jack Black does it pretty well, but he seems to be copying Dio in a way. Hmmm...
  • DovageDovage Unsigned
    edited February 2008
    How about Brad Delp from Boston, incredible. Also Tommy Shaw from Styx, and Damn Yankees, he can and has sung opera for cry aye.
  • OldFogeyOldFogey Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    Dovage;342921 said:
    Also Tommy Shaw from Styx, and Damn Yankees, he can and has sung opera for cry aye.
    Can you provide a source for that info -- I did a couple of searches and couldn't find anything. Tried Google, Tommy's official site, wikipedia....
  • Shredder87Shredder87 Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    DM725;341729 said:
    Mike Patton

    Enough said...

    Also:

    Chris Cornell (prior to 95 or so)
    my thoughts exactly. Those two have the greatest range its not even funny mike has. Done opera work too
  • WilloWWilloW Unsigned
    edited February 2008
    David from Pain Of Salvation. He is the best singer i can think of. Need proof?

    http://youtube.com/watch?v=Mvae5Lt0smI
  • xanofarxanofar Unsigned
    edited February 2008
    Shredder87;343246 said:
    my thoughts exactly. Those two have the greatest range its not even funny mike has. Done opera work too

    Come to think of it, the best singers would probably be doing opera, etc. - not rock music. I didn't even think of that... >_>
  • UltimatumUltimatum Washed Up
    edited February 2008
    Dio-Dio, Heaven And Hell

    Brent Smith-Shinedown (I don't like the band, but I can't deny that he is a great vocalist.)

    Timo Kotipelto and Timo Tolkki-Stratovarius. These two have always astonished me, each can hit Dave Mustaine-like lows and can hit high notes that put Bruce Dickinson to shame.

    Matt Barlow-Iced Earth. He has such a unique voice. Listen to songs like Melancholy, Watching Over Me, and Dante's Inferno to get a taste of what he sounds like.

    Jon Oliva-Savatage. Usually he uses his variant on Thrash, but the notes that he hits in the intro to Beyond The Doors Of The Dark show his true colors.
  • OldFogeyOldFogey Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    xanofar;343291 said:
    Come to think of it, the best singers would probably be doing opera, etc. - not rock music. I didn't even think of that... >_>
    Well yeah -- but you need to be a little skeptical about claims that any rock and roller has sung opera. What I could find out about Mike Patton was that he had performed in "an operatic piece." I didn't find any clips of that performance. There was a comment about how hard he found it to project without amplification -- that's a key point, so on that score it seems like Mike has a legitimate claim. But opera singers do it night in and night out -- I don't have any idea how many times Mike did the performance. Moreover, "singing in an operating piece" is not necessarily the same as "singing opera." There are operatic pieces with parts written specifically for singers who don't really sing opera. On the whole, I'd say Mike's claim is the best I've heard so far -- but I do have some reservations about it. What I did learn was what a great voice he has.

    Why do I care -- I subscribe to the SF Opera. I collect opera recordings. I take voice lessons. I sang in the Metropolitan Opera competition at the regional level in college. I'm not an expert, or a pro, but I know a couple of things.
  • GNRrockslifeGNRrockslife Rising Star
    edited February 2008
    Freddie Mercury
    Bruce Dickinson
    Ronnie James Dio
    Geddy Lee (In his prime)
    David Lee Roth
    Steven Tyler
    Paul Rodgers
  • OldFogeyOldFogey Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    Well since you guys like this style, I throw this name out there: Steve Marriott, front man for Humble Pie. Peter Frampton was the original lead guitarist, but I think "Clem" Clempson may be the guitarist on this live performance:





    This is Steve with Small Faces


  • AxlVanHagarAxlVanHagar Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    Leave it to Fogey to bring up a blast from the past that I should have thought before. Great call on Marriott.
  • DestromasDestromas Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    Can't believe someone said Amy Lee from Evanescence. She's doesn't even have control over thirds or fifths. My choir teacher in high school video taped her when she was on tv sucking at what she does best.

    Anyway, no Sebastian Bach from Skid Row? For something more updated try An Absence of Empathy, the second Frameshift record.

    James LaBrie from Dream Theater is good, no one likes his voice, it's kind of an acquired taste like Geddy Lee, but he's excellent, Arjen Lucassen said he was pretty much a solid one-take vocal track. As far as Dream Theater vocalists go, I am definitely a bigger fan of Charlie Dominici.

    Devin Townsend is good when he's not screaming, Terria was pretty impressive.

    Anyways, I agree with whoever said Mike Patton, David Lee Roth, Steve Perry, and Corey Taylor. Corey is just in the wrong music, he could be doing so much better stuff than slipknot.
  • Burn1nMyLightBurn1nMyLight Opening Act
    edited February 2008
    Destromas;348112 said:
    Can't believe someone said Amy Lee from Evanescence. She's doesn't even have control over thirds or fifths. My choir teacher in high school video taped her when she was on tv sucking at what she does best.

    Anyways, I agree with whoever said Mike Patton, David Lee Roth, Steve Perry, and Corey Taylor. Corey is just in the wrong music, he could be doing so much better stuff than slipknot.
    Yeah, cause we should take your re-re middle-school teacher's word for anything regarding quality. Real hard to find one little taping where someone doesn't sound perfect. If your choir teacher actually knew anything, he/she would tell you that voices change a lot based on minute details. I guess that's why your choir teacher is a huge music star, internationally reknown, not in Podunk, Indiana, teaching a bunch of pre-madonnas....oh wait...
    Ever even considered how hard it is to both play piano AND sing? Have fun being perfect at both.
    No, of course not. She just sucks, you're right. Classically-trained vocalist who can't sing, absolutely.





    And Corey Taylor DOES sing another style, in case you didn't know. He's the vocalist for Stone Sour, they're amazing, and it's there that he gets to show off his real range. Here are a few examples to enlighten you.







  • OldFogeyOldFogey Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    Burn1nMyLight;349231 said:
    Classically-trained vocalist who can't sing, absolutely.
    I'm not in this debate -- just got a question. I tried to validate what you said. I see where she is classically trained on the piano, but I couldn't see any references to her having been classically trained as a vocalist. Can you provide a reference?

    (It's not that I'm questioning it -- I just have a thing for independent verification)
  • Burn1nMyLightBurn1nMyLight Opening Act
    edited February 2008
    Well it's something that I'd heard all over the place. Doing some actual research, I found this on AOL's site....
    "AOLMusicTye: is it true you've had no vocal training at all??
    AmyOpenDoor: well, i started being in (and obsessed with) the school choir when i was about 13, so i know that helped. I even did the all-region and all-state tryouts every year, and that's a lot of extra training...
    AmyOpenDoor: i don't know, I've just always sung and played piano a lot because i wanted to. and practice makes you better. "
    So she's definitely had a bunch of schooling and practice the vocal arts. Maybe "Trained" was the wrong word; after all, she's a ROCK singer, not an Opera singer.
  • DestromasDestromas Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    She wasn't playing the piano while she was singing. So where do you get off on putting words in my mouth? I could care less on how well she plays the piano, the piano wasn't her rise to fame, especially back when that tape was out. Ben Folds is twice as skilled as her anyway.

    About All-State choirs, I made it into that one year. You don't need any training to do tryouts (unless you need to compete for a spot in districts too), granted it helps you to get IN, which by what she's quoted saying, I don't think she did. I wouldn't knock her for it either, since you have to be really amazing, and the cut score is high, they want you to know theory, sight-reading, etc. But if she's at all classically trained, she might have made it in and, not sucked on a live performance on TV. But who am I kidding? She's a PRODUCED singer, not a talented singer. Tonality might be good, and appealing, but if you need auto-tune, you're worthless in situations like that. Granted live sound has come a long way since.

    And I know about Stone Sour. But guess what? That genre of music they play is still very boring. It smells like Nickelback. Since I'm not a fan of the same chord progressions that frequently carry over in the nu-metal ballads and hard rock scenes, it's not a drastic change. While yes, I agree that it's different music, and it does highlight his voice, I still would rather hear him in a prog or speed metal band where he's not screaming. Hell, even a jazz-fusion gig would be cool.
  • Burn1nMyLightBurn1nMyLight Opening Act
    edited February 2008
    Destromas;349305 said:
    She wasn't playing the piano while she was singing. So where do you get off on putting words in my mouth? I could care less on how well she plays the piano, the piano wasn't her rise to fame, especially back when that tape was out. Ben Folds is twice as skilled as her anyway.

    About All-State choirs, I made it into that one year. You don't need any training to do tryouts (unless you need to compete for a spot in districts too), granted it helps you to get IN, which by what she's quoted saying, I don't think she did. I wouldn't knock her for it either, since you have to be really amazing, and the cut score is high, they want you to know theory, sight-reading, etc. But if she's at all classically trained, she might have made it in and, not sucked on a live performance on TV. But who am I kidding? She's a PRODUCED singer, not a talented singer. Tonality might be good, and appealing, but if you need auto-tune, you're worthless in situations like that. Granted live sound has come a long way since.

    And I know about Stone Sour. But guess what? That genre of music they play is still very boring. It smells like Nickelback. Since I'm not a fan of the same chord progressions that frequently carry over in the nu-metal ballads and hard rock scenes, it's not a drastic change. While yes, I agree that it's different music, and it does highlight his voice, I still would rather hear him in a prog or speed metal band where he's not screaming. Hell, even a jazz-fusion gig would be cool.
    Stone Sour sounds nothing like Nickelback, if you've listened to them at all. No dirty guitars, no grunge vocals, completely different sound.
    And like I said, one recording is not a large enough sample size to judge anything by. You say you've made it to all-state choir; have you never had ONE bad performance? Good thing nobody was taping it and played it for the world to see, to judge you by one time. And if they did, I would certainly hope that the rest of the population would give you the slack that you and your music teacher should have given her.
  • OldFogeyOldFogey Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    Burn1nMyLight;349263 said:
    Well it's something that I'd heard all over the place. Doing some actual research, I found this on AOL's site....
    "AOLMusicTye: is it true you've had no vocal training at all??
    AmyOpenDoor: well, i started being in (and obsessed with) the school choir when i was about 13, so i know that helped. I even did the all-region and all-state tryouts every year, and that's a lot of extra training...
    AmyOpenDoor: i don't know, I've just always sung and played piano a lot because i wanted to. and practice makes you better. "
    So she's definitely had a bunch of schooling and practice the vocal arts. Maybe "Trained" was the wrong word; after all, she's a ROCK singer, not an Opera singer.
    Cool -- that's good enuff for me. Thanks
  • DestromasDestromas Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    Burn1nMyLight;349325 said:
    Stone Sour sounds nothing like Nickelback, if you've listened to them at all. No dirty guitars, no grunge vocals, completely different sound.
    And like I said, one recording is not a large enough sample size to judge anything by. You say you've made it to all-state choir; have you never had ONE bad performance? Good thing nobody was taping it and played it for the world to see, to judge you by one time. And if they did, I would certainly hope that the rest of the population would give you the slack that you and your music teacher should have given her.
    Nothing like Nickelback? They're both writing pretty slow tempo music, with a remarkably similar time signature. Are you sure? I mean, I'm tapping my foot at pretty much the same speed here. If I sing along to the song, I'm pretty much in the same octave, and the guitars are tuned similarly in odd occurrences. Define grunge vocals for me, because both Corey and Aaron have that voice like they smoked a cigarette before their recordings.

    I don't call my career professional. If I did, I'd sound the exact same on recording as I would live. I had a session for my recording class last semester, actually, I didn't need auto-tuning. So I guess I've come a long way since then, if any of them actually were bad on my part. But if I was lucky enough to make a television debut and sing live, I wouldn't mess it up. Why go on TV to prove fakeness and get laughed at?
  • DestromasDestromas Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    Shredder87;349368 said:
    Man, you two are weenies, one being bigger than the other. STOP ARGUING!!!! It's pointless and it's making the two of you look like retards.
    Eat a cookie.
  • OldFogeyOldFogey Road Warrior
    edited February 2008
    Shredder87;349368 said:
    Man, you two are weenies, one being bigger than the other. STOP ARGUING!!!! It's pointless and it's making the two of you look like retards.
    Hey Shredder, did you check out Steve Marriott (my post above)?

    If you've never heard of Humble Pie I think you'd like 'em

    Cheers,
    Fogey
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